Videos

“Ambrose’s Jubilee Cavalcade” Side 2 (1935)

“Ambrose’s Jubilee Cavalcade” continues on side two with Elsie Carlisle singing Irving Berlin’s “What’ll I Do?” There are also other songs of the ’20s and ’30s sung by Sam Browne and the Rhythm Sisters.

AMBROSE`S JUBILEE CAVALCADE - Countinued - EMBASSY CLUB LONDON

Ambrose’s Jubilee Cavalcade, Continued -- Embassy Club, London

Video by Gernot Klawunn (YouTube)

“Ambrose’s Jubilee Cavalcade” Side 1 (1935)

On March 7, 1935, Ambrose and His Orchestra celebrated the twenty-fifth year of the reign of King George V with selections of songs popular since his accession to the throne. The first side of “Ambrose’s Jubilee Cavalcade,” which covers the years 1910-1923, features Elsie Carlisle singing “Lady Friend” (about a minute into the recording). Sam Browne and the Rhythm Sisters can also be heard in this recording.

AMBROSE`S JUBILEE CAVALCADE - EMBASSY CLUB LONDON - DECCA 12"

Ambrose’s Jubilee Cavalcade -- Embassy Club, London -- Decca 12″

Video by Gernot Klawunn (YouTube)

“My Old Flame” (1934)

“My Old Flame.” Composed by Arthur Johnston (who also wrote “Pennies from Heaven”), with lyrics by Sam Coslow. Elsie Carlisle with Ambrose and His Orchestra (Embassy Club, London, November 1, 1934). Decca F 5293.

My old flame - Ambrose and his orchestra with Elsie Carlisle

“My Old Flame” -- Ambrose and His Orchestra with Elsie Carlisle

Video by Julian Dyer (YouTube)

“Please Leave My Butter Alone” (1940)

“Please Leave My Butter Alone.” Recorded by Elsie Carlisle on December 27, 1940 in the context of war rationing:

“Everybody pinches my butter;
They won’t leave my butter alone!
And nothing is better than butter
For keeping the old man at home.

Everybody says I’m old-fashioned
To sit on the things that are rationed, etc.”

Elsie Carlisle - Please Leave My Butter Alone

Please Leave My Butter Alone -- Elsie Carlisle

Video by Twenties Girl (YouTube)

It must have seemed obvious to have Miss Carlisle express herself with such double-entendre, but the song had actually been first recorded that year by Elsie and Doris Waters (a.k.a. Gert and Daisy). There was even a version by the comedian Arthur Askey:

Arthur Askey - Please Leave My Butter Alone

Arthur Askey -- Please Leave My Butter Alone

Video by Andrew Oldham (YouTube)

All of which raises the question: in wartime, if you were inclined to pinch someone’s butter, whose butter would you pinch?

"The Idol of the Radio." British dance band singer of the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s.