Croonette: An Elsie Carlisle Discography

Table of Contents


Introduction

Elsie Carlisle started her career as a child chorus girl on the late Edwardian stage and effectively retired by the end of the Second World War with the well-earned epithet “Idol of the Radio.” Radio was the medium through which millions had come to love her. She had reached the public through other means as well, including short films and television (when that technology was in its infancy). Yet for an appreciation of her contribution to culture, twenty-first-century connoisseurs of popular song are almost entirely dependent on her voice’s persistence on the brittle shellac records of the time (or on the rare alternatives, primitive plastic or cardboard and acetate discs). Many such discs survive that are helpfully labeled as being by “Elsie Carlisle,” and yet aficionados of her music will agree that some of her best music is on records where she is credited only as “vocal refrain” or “vocal chorus.” There are even instances where she worked under a pseudonym: as Maisie Ramsey on Ariel Grand Records, as Sheila Kay on Worldecho, as Amy Brunton on Filmophone, and as Lallie Lack on Sterno and 4 in 1. She even appeared as one of “The Masqueraders” on Plaza and as Sam Browne’s “Girl Friend” on Regal Zonophone. Moreover, when we move beyond how each record is labeled, there is the additional complication that sometimes identically labeled records preserve different takes of a song and may even derive from different recording sessions. To be able to firmly identify a record with an Elsie Carlisle vocal on it, to tell the difference between different takes and sessions, and thereby to chart the course of Elsie’s recording career, we must rely on the aid of a discography.

Two previous discographies have been written about Elsie Carlisle’s artistic output. The first, Edward S. Walker’s Elsie Carlisle — With a Different Style (1974), has been in almost every respect superseded by Richard Johnson’s Elsie Carlisle: A Discography (1994). Johnson includes extensive information based on archival research about the identity of bands and accompanists, even going so far as to identify individual band personnel. His work is nearly complete; of Elsie’s issued recordings, it omits only one Decca Rhythm Maniacs title, three songs from the HMV “C” series, an HMV “B” series side, and two songs on Panachord. It would be hard to improve upon Johnson’s deep knowledge of band personnel, so I do not attempt to do so. Rather, I aim for greater completeness and accuracy, providing more information about known additional takes and identifying the presence of other singers or speakers, using as my primary evidence the labels, the shellac, and the music itself.

I frequently cite other varieties of discography. Ross Laird’s 1996 Moanin’ Low is an ambitious collection of artist discographies documenting the careers of popular female Anglophone singers who recorded from 1920-1933. Laird builds upon Johnson’s work, although the narrower focus of his book necessarily omits the second half of Elsie’s career. An even more general discography that cannot be overlooked is Brian Rust and Sandy Forbes’s British Dance Bands on Record, from which Johnson must have benefited himself. I also cite the sixth edition of Rust’s Jazz and Ragtime Records.

Label discographies are another useful source of information. Several print works and one CD-ROM resource in my reference list have proved very useful to my research, but perhaps none so much as the web-based Kelly Online Database, a study of Gramophone Company sessions and issues (both British and foreign), which has allowed me to move back the date of Elsie’s first known session by eight years to 1918. Also very useful are Mike Thomas’s online resources for British 78 rpm record labels, which provide extraorinarily useful information about some of the less well-documented record companies.

In this discography, session descriptions are based primarily on the wording of the record labels themselves and supplemented when necessary with other known information. Dates are mostly taken from Laird, Johnson, and the Kelly database. It should be noted that dating Dominion and Imperial records is notoriously difficult, and those dates will probably always remain approximate. For recording locations, Johnson’s research is augmented by the evidence of Kelly’s study of Gramophone Company records.

I am sometimes asked how many recordings Elsie made. I think a good answer can be given if the criteria are clearly stated. If by “recording” we mean “a matrix with one or more takes of Elsie singing or even speaking,” then Elsie is known to have made at least 332 recordings (including a surviving radio transcription), with two more matrices likely to include a vocal by her (HMV matrix 0B-3148 and Sterno matrix S-2607). There are also four records that contain dubs of other records but that do not represent original recordings.

I wrote the first version of this discography in March-April 2020 while self-isolating during the coronavirus pandemic, basing it on six years’ worth of notes and observations that I made collecting Elsie’s records and creating elsiecarlisle.com. I issued minor corrections and improvements soon thereafter and included an alphabetical song index. The lastest version of the discography (2.0.0) draws on new sources of information, most importantly the Kelly Online Database. New features in version 2 include the listing, for each of Elsie’s recordings, of any known 78 rpm issues or reissues made outside of Great Britain. Approximate release dates are also supplied, when available; to arrive at these dates, I have made use both of label discographies and done some original research of my own into supplements, advertisements, and reviews. I have also included an appendix identifying songs occasionally misidentified as including Elsie Carlisle vocals.

I intend to continue issuing updates to this discography. The latest version should be available in web format on elsiecarlisle.com and as a PDF on Zenodo. Please contact me with any suggestions you have for its improvement. I am particurly keen on identifying previously unidentified issued takes (the ones known to have been issued are underlined in the text). And since the wording of the session headers is based partially on the record labels themselves, I would like to see labels that I have not been able to inspect yet — those are italicized.

For helping me prepare version 2, special thanks go to David Weavings (for making me aware of the Kelly Online Database), to Charles Hippisley-Cox for sharing rare recordings and great advice, to Steve Paget and Terry Brown for consulting their personal libraries on my behalf, to Henry Parsons and my wife Erin for being reliable sounding boards for my ideas, and again to Erin for editing the final product. Thanks also go to:

  • Enrico Borsetti
  • Robert P. Cachur
  • Stephen Clarke
  • Julian Dyer
  • Michael Fenwick
  • Jonathan David Holmes
  • Clive Hooley
  • Erik Høst
  • Mick Johnson
  • Marilyn Kerley
  • Brett Lowe
  • Barry McCanna
  • Ray Pallett
  • Mike Taylor
  • Mike Thomas
  • Peter Wallace
  • John Watson
  • John Wright

A. G. Kozak
Berkeley, California
elsiecarlisle.com
January 28, 2021 (Elsie’s 125th birthday)


Reference List

  • Adrian, Karlo, and Arthur Badrock. 1989. Edison Bell Winner Records. Second, revised edition. Bournemouth: E. Bayly. (EBWR)
  • Andrews, Frank. 1985. Columbia 10″ Records, 1904-30. London: City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society. (FA-Col)
  • ⸻. 2006. Zonophone Double-Sided Records 10 and 12 Inch Numerical Listing – Volumes 1 & 2. Wells-next-the-Sea, North Norfolk: City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society. (FA-Zon)
  • Andrews, Frank, and Ernie Bayly. 2000. A Numerical Listing of the H.M.V. “B” Series of 78 rpm Records. Wells-next-the-Sea, North Norfolk: City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society. (AB)
  • Andrews, Frank, and Bill Dean-Myatt. 2014. The Imperial Records. CLPGS Reference Series No. 33. Hailsham, East Sussex: City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society. (ADM)
  • Andrews, Frank, and Michael Smith. 1986. “His Master’s Voice” — the ‘C’ series. Complete Catalogue of Records. Wells-next-the-Sea, North Norfolk: City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society, 2004. (AS)
  • Badrock, Arthur. 1986. Dominion Records: A Catalogue & History. Second Revised Edition. Bournemouth: Talking Machine Review.
  • ⸻. 1994a. The Parlophone Red Label Popular Series E5000 — E6428. Hunstanton, Norfolk: Witley Press Ltd. (PRL)
  • ⸻. 1994b. Review of Elsie Carlisle: A Discography, by Richard J. Johnson, Talking Machine Review 88 (Autumn/Winter): 2571. https://archive.org/details/TMR88.
  • Badrock, Arthur, with Frank Andrews and Grant Pilcher. 1998. Filmophone Discography. Gillingham, Kent: Talking Machine Review. (FD)
  • Bolig, John R. 2017. The Bluebird Label Discography. https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/BoligBluebirdLabel.pdf. American Discography Project (UC Santa Barbara Library). (BLD)
  • Calkin, Graham. 2007. “Arthur Calkin with Ray Starita.” Graham Calkin’s Family Webpages. http://www.calkin.co.uk/arthur_chapter3.html.
  • Discography of American Historical Recordings. 2020. Accessed July 15. https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/index.php. (DAHR)
  • Hayes, J. G. 1974. Disc Research England. Rex 8000 Series. 8001 to 10241. Sep. 1933 to March 1948. An A to Z Artist Catalogue. Liverpool: J. G. Hayes.
  • Hill, Dick. 1993. Silvester Ahola: The Gloucester Gabriel. Studies in Jazz, No. 14. Metuchen, New Jersey: The Scarecrow Press. (DH)
  • Johnson, Richard J. 1994. Elsie Carlisle: A Discography. Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire: Richard J. Johnson. (RJJ)
  • ⸻. 2012. “Elsie Carlisle (with a different style).” Memory Lane 174 (Spring): 22-26; 175 (Summer): 39-43; 176 (Autumn): 32-37; 177 (Winter): 38-43.
  • Kelly Online Database: A searchable database of recordings made by the Gramophone Company, and its successor corporations during the 78 RPM era. 2020. Derived from lists assembled by the late Dr. Alan Kelly. Edited by Stephen R. Clarke and Roger Tessier. Last updated November 21, 2020. https://www.kellydatabase.org/Entry.aspx. (KOD)
  • Koert, Hans. 2006. Durium (GB) Discography: The European Issues of the Durium Products (GB) Ltd. (incl. Sefono and Veckans Skiva). Heinkenszand, The Netherlands: Hans Koert.
  • Laird, Ross. 1996. Moanin’ Low: A Discography of Female Popular Vocal Recordings, 1920-1933. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. (RL)
  • Hughes, Spike. 1935. “Decca Days.” Swing Music 1.4 (June): 83-84, 112. https://nationaljazzarchive.org.uk/explore/journals/swing-music/vol1-no4-june-1935/1262407-swing-music-vol1-no4-june-1935-0003.
  • Needlepoint [Edgar Jackson]. 1927a. “The Gramophone Review.” Melody Maker, August 1, 779-786, ProQuest.
  • ⸻. 1927b. “The Gramophone Review.” Melody Maker, December 1, 1265-1275, ProQuest.
  • Pallett, Ray. 2015. They Called Him Al: The Musical Life of Al Bowlly. Albany, Georgia, USA: BearManor Media. (RP)
  • Rust, Brian. 1978. The American Record Label Book.. New York: Da Capo Press.
  • ⸻. 2016. Jazz and Ragtime Records 1897-1942. Sixth Edition. Free Personal-Use Edition. Littleton, Colorado: Mainspring Press. https://78records.files.wordpress.com/2020/05/rust_jazz-records_free-edition-6.pdf. (JRR)
  • Rust, Brian, and Allen G. Debus. 1973. The Complete Entertainment Discography, from the Mid-1890s to 1942. New Rochelle, New York: Arlington House.
  • Rust, Brian, and Sandy Forbes. 1989. British Dance Bands on Record, 1911 to 1945, and Supplement. Bungay, Suffolk: Richard Clay, Ltd. (BDBR)
  • Smith, Michael. 2009. Decca Records Company, Ltd. Royal Blue and Gold ‘F’ Series 10 Inch 78 rpm Records. Volumes I and II. Hunstanton, Norfolk: The Whitley Press. (MS-F)
  • ⸻. 2010. Decca ‘A’, ‘K’, ‘M’, ‘S’, ‘T’, ‘X’ and ‘Z’ Series. Hunstanton, Norfolk: Whitley Press Ltd. (MS-K)
  • Smith, Michael, and Frank Andrews. 2004. “His Master’s Voice” Records: ‘BD’ prefixed series of 10 inch Magenta label. Gillingham, Kent: City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society. (SA)
  • Thomas, Michael G. 2018. “Eclipse.” Mike Thomas’ Website. Last modified April 22, 2018. http://www.mgthomas.co.uk/Records/LabelPages/Eclipse.htm. (MGT-Ecl)
  • ⸻. 2019. “Worldecho.” Mike Thomas’ Website. Last modified June 5, 2019. http://www.mgthomas.co.uk/Records/LabelPages/Worldecho.htm. (MGT-WE)
  • ⸻. 2020a. “Ariel.” Mike Thomas’s Website. Last modified December 3, 2020. http://www.mgthomas.co.uk/Records/LabelPages/Ariel.htm. (MGT-Ar)
  • ⸻. 2020b. “Rex.” Mike Thomas’ Website. Last modified October 19, 2020. http://www.mgthomas.co.uk/Records/LabelPages/Rex.htm. (MGT-Rex)
  • ⸻. 2020c. “Sterno.” Mike Thomas’ Website. Last modified November 28, 2020. http://www.mgthomas.co.uk/Records/LabelPages/Sterno.htm. (MGT-St)
  • Walker, Edward S. 1974. Elsie Carlisle – With a Different Style: A Discography. Mastin Moor, Chesterfield: Edwards S. Walker. (ESW)

General Electronic Resources


Abbreviations

Sources

ADMFrank Andrews and Bill Dean-Myatt. The Imperial Records.
AGKThe evidence of my own collection.
ABFrank Andrews and Ernie Bayly. A Numerical Listing of the H.M.V. “B” Series of 78 rpm Records.
ASFrank Andrews and Michael Smith. “His Master’s Voice” — the “C” series.
BDBRBrian Rust and Sandy Forbes. British Dance Bands on Record.
BLDJohn R. Bolig. The Bluebird Label Discography.
DAHRDiscography of American Historical Recordings
DHDick Hill. Silvester Ahola: The Gloucester Gabriel.
EBWRKarlo Adrian and Arthur Badrock. Edison Bell Winner Records.
ESWEdward S. Walker. Elsie Carlisle - With a Different Style: A Discography.
FA-ColFrank Andrews. Columbia 10″ Records, 1904-30.
FA-ZonFrank Andrews. Zonophone Double-Sided Records 10 and 12 Inch Numerical Listing - Volumes 1 & 2.
FDArthur Badrock. Filmophone Discography.
JRRBrian Rust. Jazz and Ragtime Records.
KODKelly Online Database.
MGT-ArMichael G. Thomas. “Ariel.”
MGT-Ecl⸻. “Eclipse.”
MGT-Rex⸻. “Rex.”
MGT-St⸻. “Sterno.”
MGT-WE⸻. “Worldecho.”
MS-FMichael Smith. Decca Records Company, Ltd. Royal Blue and Gold ‘F’ Series 10 Inch 78 rpm Records.
MS-K⸻. Decca ‘A’, ‘K’, ‘M’, ‘S’, ‘T’, ‘X’ and ‘Z’ Series.
PRLArthur Badrock. The Parlophone Red Label Popular Series E5000 — E6428.
RJJRichard J. Johnson. Elsie Carlisle: A Discography.
RLRoss Laird. Moanin’ Low.
RPRay Pallett. They Called Him Al.
SAMichael Smith and Frank Andrews. “His Master’s Voice” Records: ‘BD’ prefixed series.

Record Labels

ArAriel Grand Record
BBBluebird
ColColumbia
DecDecca
DnDominion
EBWEdison Bell Winner
ElElectrola
EclEclipse
FilmFilmophone
ImpImperial
ParParlophone
RZRegal Zonophone
StSterno
WEWorldecho
ZonZonophone

Two-Letter Country Abbreviations

AUAustralia
CZCzechoslovakia
DEGermany
FRFrance
IEIreland
INIndia
ITItaly
NONorway
USUnited States

Discography

For a list of conventions used in this discography, see Appendix A.

ELSIE CARLISLE. Factory Studio, Hayes, Middlesex, March 7, 1918.

21039-e Some girl has got to darn his socks (from “Round the Map”) (Finck) Test

The “-e” in the matrix is a Gramophone Company suffix, not a take.

KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE (as MAISIE RAMSEY on Ariel), comedienne, with piano (Carroll Gibbons). Studio B, Hayes, Middlesex, May 25, 1926.

Bb-8425-1-2 Nothing else to do (Bergere-Goodwin-Shay) Commercial test
Bb-8426-1-2 I love my baby (Warren) Zon 2772 (inc. AU) (9/26)
Bb-8427-1 So is your old lady (Burke-Dubin) Zon 2757 (inc. AU) (8/26), Ar 940, 1006

The matrix prefixes are those of HMV, not Zonophone (Andrews 2006, 218, 220).

RJJ, RL, FA-Zon, KOD, MGT-Ar

Studio B, Hayes, Middlesex, June 21, 1926.

Yy-8563-1-2 Coming thro’ the cornfield (H. Nicholls) Zon 2772 (inc. AU) (9/26)
Yy-8564-1-2 Always (Berlin) Zon unissued
Yy-8565-1-2-3 Nobody’s business (Milne-Gaskell) Zon 2757 (inc. AU) (8/26)
Yy-8565'-1-2 Coming thro’ the cornfield (H. Nicholls) Test

Yy-8565' takes 1 and 2 are, according to the Gramophone Company ledger, “[t]est[s] of quiet singing.” The apostrophe in the matrix name is meant only to show that matrix Yy-8565 was reused; the symbol will not be found in actual pressings (Kelly 2020).

RJJ, RL, FA-Zon, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with piano (Carroll Gibbons). Additional vocals by Carroll Gibbons (-1). Studio B, Hayes, Middlesex, October 6, 1926.

Yy-9071-1-2 Oh, my bundle of love (Silver-Price) Zon 2829 (1/27)
Yy-9072-1-2-3 I’m flirting with you (Leonard) Zon 2829 (1/27) (-1)
Yy-9073-1-2 Ya gotta know how to love (Warren-Green) Zon 2815 (12/26) (-1)
Yy-9074-1-2 My cutey’s due at two-to-two to-day (von Tilzer-Robin) Zon 2815 (12/26) (-1)

Andrews leaves open the possibility that a record with take 1 of Yy-9074 was issued (2006, 223).

Richard J. Johnson believes that an Ariel issue was made from this session (1994, 5), but it is possible that he is thinking of Bb-8427-1 on Ariel 940 and 1006, which he omits from his discography.

RJJ, RL, FA-Zon, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with THE GILT-EDGED FOUR. London, February 4, 1927.

WA-4788-1 Meadow lark (Fiorito-Keidel) Col 4275 (80 rpm) (3/27)
WA-4789-1-2 How many times? (Irving Berlin) Col unissued (80 rpm)
WA-4790-1-2 For my sweetheart (Donaldson-Kahn) Col unissued (80 rpm)

FA-Col, RJJ, RL, JRR

London, February 7, 1927.

WA-4805-1 I can’t get over a boy like you (Ruskin-Broones) Col 4275 (80 rpm) (3/27)

FA-Col, RJJ, RL, JRR

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with piano (Carroll Gibbons). Studio C, Small Queen’s Hall, London, April 5, 1927.

Bb-10514-1-2-3 Baby (“Castles in the Air”) (Peck-Wenrich) HMV B-2489 (inc. AU) (7/27)
Bb-10515-1-2 Ain’t she sweet? (Yellen-Ager) HMV rejected
Bb-10516-1-2 Nesting time (Monaco-Dixon) HMV unissued
Bb-10517-1-2-3 Shepherd of the hills (Horatio Nicholls) HMV unissued

Johnson places this session in Studio B of the Small Queen’s Hall (1994, 6), but Kelly has Studio C (2020).

RJJ, RL, AB, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with piano (Carroll Gibbons) and violin. Studio C, Small Queen’s Hall, London, May 6, 1927.

Bb-10514-4-5 Baby (“Castles in the Air”) (Peck-Wenrich) HMV B-2489 (7/27)
Bb-10515-3-4 Ain’t she sweet? (Yellen-Ager) HMV unissued

Johnson and Laird believe that neither take 4 nor take 5 of Bb-10514 was issued (1994, 5; 1996, 72), but David Weavings has an issued copy of take 5 where the label clearly identifies the accompaniment as piano and violin. What is more, the Kelly database suggests that only take 5 was intended to be issued (2020); the decision to release takes 1 and 3 may have occurred later. It is interesting to note that Edgar Jackson’s and Christopher Stone’s 1927 reviews of HMV B-2489 were based on a copy of the record that had both piano and violin — presumably take 5 (Needlepoint 1927a, 784; Christopher Stone [T. M. Peppering, pseud.], Gramophone, August 1927, 110, Exact Editions).

Johnson has Studio B, Hayes, most likely because he conflates this session with the one that follows (1994, 6; see the next entry). Kelly has Elsie return to Studio C of the Small Queen’s Hall to finish recording “Baby” and “Ain’t she sweet?” before changing locations — and pianists — to record two new songs (2020).

RJJ, RL, AB, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with piano (Arthur Young) and violin. Studio B, Hayes, Middlesex, May 6, 1927

Bb-10689-1-2 He’s the last word (Donaldson-Kahn) HMV B-2579 (11/27)
Bb-10690-1-2-3 Since I found you (Clare-Woods) HMV B-2489 (inc. AU) (7/27)

The evidence of the Kelly database is that Elsie was at two separate recording sessions on May 6, 1927 (2020). One was held in Studio C of the Small Queen’s Hall for the final takes of “Baby” and “Ain’t she sweet?”, and Carroll Gibbons was the pianist (see the previous entry). The other session was at Studio B, Hayes, for the recordings of “He’s the last word” and “Since I found you,” with a certain “S. Young” at the piano.

I suspect “S. Young” to be a typographical error for “A. Young” (“A” being adjacent to “S” on the typewriter), i.e., Arthur Young, who had accompanied Elsie on the radio in 1926. In his contemporary reviews of HMV B-2489 and B-2579, industry insider Edgar Jackson was convinced that Arthur Young was the pianist on all four record sides. In his first review he “guess[es]” the identities of the accompanists (Needlepoint 1927a, 784), while in his second review he simply asserts them as fact. Jackson supposes Hugo Rignold to be the violinist for all four sides of HMV B-2489 and B-2579 (Needlepoint 1927b, 1273), an identification which could be true for any or all of the sides in question.

It should be noted that Johnson considers the previous session and this one to be one session, held at Studio B, Hayes, with Carroll Gibbons as the pianist for all four songs (1994, 6).

RJJ, RL, AB, KOD

Studio B, Hayes, Middlesex August 22, 1927.

Bb-11402-1-2 I’m in love again (Cole Porter) HMV unissued
Bb-11403-1-2 What’s the use of crying? (Kindel-Forbstein) HMV B-2579 (11/27)
Bb-11404-1-2-3 Song of the wanderer (Neil Moret) HMV unissued

As with the previous session, Kelly identifies the pianist as “S. Young” (2020; see previous entry), while Johnson unequivocally lists Arthur Young (1994, 6).

RJJ, RL, AB, KOD

With Ronnie Munro and His Dance Orchestra as the PARLOPHONE VARIETY COMPANY. London, November 12, 1928.

E-2180-2 Chloe (in “Dance and song medley, part 4”) (Kahn-Moret) Par E-6108 (12/28), Ar 4319

BDBR, RJJ, PRL, RL, MGT-Ar

London, November 13, 1928.

E-2181-2 My inspiration is you (in “Dance and song medley, part 1”) (Leslie-Nicholls) Par E-6107 (12/28), Ar 4319

BDBR, RJJ, PRL, RL, MGT-Ar

ELSIE CARLISLE, the popular comedienne (accompanied by Jay Wilbur and His Orchestra). London, c. December 1928.

1055-1-2 Dada, dada (Dore-LeClerq) Dn A-43 (1/29)
1056-1-2-3 I can’t give you anything but love (McHugh-Fields) Dn A-43 (1/29)

RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, celebrated comedienne; piano accomp. by KENNETH BROADBERRY. London, c. January 1929.

1074-2 If I had you (Shapiro-Campbell-Connolly) Dn A-57 (2/29)
1075-1-2 I must be dreaming (Dubin-Flaherty-Sherman) Dn A-57 (2/29)

RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, the popular comedienne, vocal; orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur and His Orchestra). London, c. February 1929.

1110-2 Happy days and lonely nights (Rose-Fisher) Dn A-71 (3/29)
1111-2 That Monte Carlo song (Endor-Steinberg) Dn A-71 (3/29)

RJJ, RL

London, c. March 1929.

1147-3 Dreaming of tomorrow (Pola-Cardew) Dn A-83 (4/29)
1148-2 Is there anything wrong in that? (Cleary-Magidson) Dn A-83 (4/29)

RJJ, RL

London, c. May 1929.

1251-4 What is this thing called love? (from Cochran’s 1929 Revue “Wake up and Dream”) (Cole Porter) Dn A-125 (6/29)
1252-2 Let’s do it – let’s fall in love (from Cochran’s 1929 Revue “Wake up and Dream”) (Cole Porter) Dn A-125 (6/29)

RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, the celebrated comedienne, vocal; orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur and His Orchestra). London, c. July 1929.

1362-3 Mean to me (Turk-Ahlert) Dn A-168 (9/30)
1363-3 Tell me more about love (Page) Dn A-168 (9/30)

Badrock has 1363-2 (1986, 17).

RJJ, RL

Vocal refrain for THE RHYTHM MANIACS (Arthur Lally dir.; as PHILIP LEWIS AND HIS DANCE ORCHESTRA on Dec F-1541). Chenil Galleries, Chelsea, London, August 23, 1929.

MB-414-1-2 Why can’t you? (from the film “Say It with Song”) (Jolson-de Sylva-Brown-Henderson) Dec F-1523 (10/29)
MB-415-1 Come on, baby (Gottler-Clare-Pinkard) Retrieval FG-412
MB-415-2 Come on, baby (Gottler-Clare-Pinkard) Dec F-1528 (10/29)
MB-416-1 He’s a good man to have around (Yellen-Ager) Dec F-1541 (11/29), Retrieval FG-412
MB-416-2 He’s a good man to have around (Yellen-Ager) Dec F-1541 (11/29)

BDBR, RJJ, RL, JRR, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, the celebrated comedienne, vocal; with orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, c. September 1929.

1446-1 I’ll get by (as long as I have you) (Turk-Ahlert) Dn A-180 (10/29)
1447-2 I’m just in the mood tonight (Leslie-Nicholls) Dn A-180 (10/29)

RJJ, RL

Vocal refrain for The Rhythm Maniacs as PHILIP LEWIS AND HIS ORCHESTRA (Arthur Lally dir.). Chelsea, London, September 14, 1929.

DJ-49-1-2 When my dreams come true (Berlin) Dec F-1539 (11/29)
DJ-50-1-2 To be in love (Turk-Ahlert) Dec F-1541 (11/29)

ESW, DH, RJJ, RL, MS-F

SHEILA KAY, comedienne, with orchestra (Cecil Norman dir.). London, October 16, 1929.

118-1-2 Through (James V. Monaco) WE A-1012
119-1 Am I blue? (Akst-Clarke) WE A-1012
120-1 He’s a good man to have around (from “Honky Tonk”) (Ager-Yellen) WE A-1013
121-1 I’m doing what I’m doing for love (from “Honky Tonk”) (Ager-Yellen) WE A-1013

RJJ, RL, JRR, MGT-WE, AGK

London, c. October 1929.

1531-1-2 Ain’t misbehavin’ (Waller-Brooks-Razaf) Dn A-215
1532-2 Honey (Simons-Gillespie-Whiting) Dn A-215

RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal; orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, c. December 1929.

1617-1 I’m “ka-razy” for you (Jolson-Rose-Dreyer) Dn A-235 (1/30)
1618-1-2 The one that I love loves me (Turk-Ahlert) Dn A-235 (1/30)

Dominion A-235 was issued both with cream-colored labels (with the encircled globe logo) and with plain white labels (Johnson 1994, 9).

RJJ, RL

With the LIGHT OPERA COMPANY (Ray Noble dir.; other vocalists are Anona Winn and a male quartet). Studio C, Small Queen’s Hall, London, February 28, 1930.

Cc-18897-1-2-3 “Here comes the bride”: selection (Schwartz) HMV rejected (12″)
Cc-18898-1-2-3 “Darling, I love you”—vocal gems (Hedley-Acres) HMV C-1871 (5/30) (12″)

It is uncertain which songs from the musical Here Comes the Bride were used in the first three takes of Cc-18897. The issued take or takes (4 and/or 5), which was or were recorded on March 25, 1930 and issued on HMV C-1871, have Alice Moxon, Webster Booth, Stuart Robertson, and George Baker singing “I love you and I like you,” “I’ll always remember,” “High and low,” and “I’m like a sailor.”

The songs from Darling, I Love You are “Shoo your blues away,” “Now I’m in love,” “Lovely lady,” and “I know something,” but I have not confirmed which ones Elsie sings.

AS, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal; orch. accom. (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, c. March 1930.

1713-1-3-R-R2 Body and soul (Sour-Heyman-Green) Dn C-307
1714-1-2-3-R2 My man o’ war (Williams-Waller-Razaf) Dn C-307, Film 143

Johnson discusses the possibility that the “R” and “R2” takes are dubbed versions (1994, 9-10), and my own experiments have convinced me that this is the case. 1713-R plays 0.6% more quickly than 1713-1, but the two are otherwise identical. 1714-R2 plays 1.9% more slowly than an earlier take of 1714 (whose number is unfortunately obscured by the label), but the two are clearly the same recording. The fact that the only differences between these pairs of takes is a slight variation in speed would suggest imperfect playback in the dubbing process.

It used to be rumored that C-307 had been banned, and that the risqué song “My man o’ war” caused Dominion to incur a fine so great that it put it out of business (Walker 1974, Introduction; Rust 1978, 101). This was likely a fantasy engaged in by collectors who wanted to think that their copies were rarer than they are. In fact, Dominion C-307 would appear to be surprisingly common — quite probably Elsie’s best-selling record up to that time. From 2010-2020, the auction-monitoring website popsike.com tracked the sales of 44 Elsie Carlisle Dominions, 21 of which were C-307. The runner-up is Dominion A-168 (“Mean to me” / “Tell me more about love”), with only five copies sold. My conclusion is that original sales of C-307 were unusually good, and so a situation in which the original masters were worn out and dubbing was relied on seems fairly likely. My one reservation in declaring the “R” and “R2” takes dubs is that the sound quality is so good. Dominion was known more for technical ineptitude than anything else, but the “R” and “R2” takes that I have heard are excellent work by any standard.

Dominion C-307 was issued at first with simple, white labels and later with red labels with the familiar Dominion logo on them.

Only some copies of Filmophone 143 have 1713 on them (with Karl Radlach and His Orchestra — as the HOLLYWOOD DANCE BAND — on the reverse). On the others, a new recording of the song can be found (Badrock 1998, 3).

RJJ, RL, JRR

ELSIE CARLISLE; orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, August 1930.

5448-1-2-3 Exactly like you (Fields-McHugh) Imp 2318 (9/30)
5449-1-2 I like to do things for you (from the film “King of Jazz”) (Yellen-Ager) Imp 2318 (9/30)

RJJ, RL, ADM, AGK

ELSIE CARLISLE; orchestral accompaniment (?Jay Wilbur dir.). London, September 1930.

5464-3 He’s my secret passion (Valentine-Young) Imp 2333 (10/30)
5465-3 I wonder what is really on his mind (Bryan-Ward) Imp 2333 (10/30)

5465-1 has been reported but not confirmed.

Johnson notes that, with take numbers going as high as 5 for 5464 and 6 for 5465, it is likely that recordings were made over the course of two sessions (1994, 10). Laird divides the sessions up as I have done here (1996, 73; see the next session).

RJJ, RL, ADM

London, September 1930.

5464-4-5 He’s my secret passion (Valentine-Young) Imp 2333 (10/30)
5465-4-5-6 I wonder what is really on his mind (Bryan-Ward) Imp 2333 (10/30)

For take 3 of each matrix, see the previous session.

RJJ, RL, ADM

ELSIE CARLISLE; orchestral accompaniment. London, September 1930.

5472-2 Goodbye to all that (Harry S. Pepper-Hackforth) Imp 2346 (11/30)
5473-1-2 Little white lies (Walter Donaldson) Imp 2346 (11/30)

RJJ, RL, ADM

Vocal in A POT POURRI OF THE YEAR’S SUCCESSES BY FAMOUS IMPERIAL ARTISTES (with Jay Wilbur and His Band). London, c. September 1930.

5508-2-3 Dada, dada (Dore-LeClerq) (in “Imperial Revels – Part 2”) Imp 2359 (12/30)

Elsie is introduced in song by John Thorne, Albert Whelan, and Jack Plant. After she sings the refrain of “Dada, dada,” they bid her farewell.

RJJ, RL, ADM

ELSIE CARLISLE; orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur and His Band). London, c. October 1930.

5509-1-2 Wasn’t it nice? (Young-Simons) Imp 2362 (12/30)
5510-1-2 More than you know (Vincent Youmans-Rose-Eliscu) Imp 2362 (12/30)

RJJ, RL, ADM, AGK

ELSIE CARLISLE; orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, October 1930.

5535-3-4 Go home and tell your mother (McHugh-Fields) Imp 2381 (1/31)
5536-3-4 Dada! Dada! (Dore-LeClerq) Imp 2381 (1/31)

RJJ, RL, ADM

London, December 1930.

5573-2 What good am I without you? (Milton Ager) Imp 2400 (2/31)
5574-1-2 That man of my dreams (Beresford—Croom-Johnson) Imp 2400 (2/31)

RJJ, RL, ADM

London, January 1931.

5602-1 My handy man ain’t handy no more (Razaf-Blake) Imp 2439 (4/31)
5603-1-3 You’re driving me crazy (Walter Donaldson) Imp 2439 (4/31)

RJJ, RL, ADM

As GRACIE COLLINS, vocal. With orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, February 25, 1931.

JW-173-2-3 He’s not worth your tears (Dixon-Rose-Warren) Ecl 50 (8″)

Older discographies incorrectly assign take 2 to Elaine Rosslyn, who does sing take 1.

RJJ, RL, MGT-Ecl, AGK

Vocal chorus for JACK PAYNE AND HIS B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA. London, March 3, 1931.

CA-11275-1-2 Ten cents a dance (Hart-Rodgers) Col CB-249, DO-393 (AU)

Takes 3 and 4 (unissued) are of Betty Bolton.

BDBR (see Suppl.), RJJ, RL

London, March 31, 1931.

CA-11275-5 Ten cents a dance (Rodgers-Hart) Col CB-249

Takes 3 and 4 (unissued) are of Betty Bolton.

BDBR, RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal; orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.) (-1); piano (and chimes) accompaniment (-2). London, April 1931.

5663-1-2 Ten cents a dance (Rodgers-Hart) Imp 2469 (6/31) (-1)
5664-2 Crying myself to sleep (Klenner-Wendling) Imp 2469 (6/31) (-2)

There are two pianists in “Crying myself to sleep”; Badrock suggests that they are seated at the same piano (1994b, 2571).

RJJ, RL, ADM

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal; orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, May 1931.

5701-2 Alone and afraid (Leigh-Trent) Imp 2489 (7/31)

It was previously believed that Elsie Carlisle recorded something on matrix 5700 during this session, but in fact the matrix is of Sylvia Cecil singing “Soul of the violets” (Imperial 2476).

RJJ, RL, ADM

London, June 1931.

5717-3 My canary has circles under his eyes (Kohler-Pola-Golden) Imp 2489 (7/31)

RJJ, RL, ADM

With SPIKE HUGHES AND HIS ORCHESTRA. London, June 18, 1931.

GB-2920-1-2 Hangin’ on to that man (Myerow-Capano-Filler) Dec rejected

Brian Rust lists two unissued takes of “To whom it may concern” as having been recorded with Elsie at this session (GB-2917-1-2; Rust 2016, 858), but GB-2917-2 appears on a CD compilation (KCM003/004), and it is Val Rosing who sings. Moreover, Spike Hughes himself remembered the singer as having been Val Rosing when he wrote about this session (1935, 84, 112). I should very much like to hear take 1 just to rule out the possibility that it features Elsie.

RJJ, RL, JRR

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal. With orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, July 1931.

5734-1-2 If I had my time over again! (Tilsley-Evans-Stanley) Imp 2511 (8/31)
5735-1-2 You didn’t have to tell me (I knew it all the time) (Donaldson) Imp 2511 (8/31)

RJJ, RL, ADM

London, August 1931.

5769-2 Pardon me, pretty baby (Klages-Meskill-Rose) Imp 2532 (9/31)
5770-2 Poor kid (Gilbert-Greer) Imp 2532 (9/31)

RJJ, RL, ADM

Vocal refrain for Spike Hughes and His Dance Orchestra as ARTHUR LALLY AND THE MILLION-AIRS. Chelsea, London, September 4, 1931.

GB-3182-1-2 Just a dancing sweetheart (Tobias-De Rose) Dec F-2510 (10/31)

The label reads “Arthur Lally and the Million-Airs,” but Johnson is almost certainly correct in identifying the band as Spike Hughes’s (1994, 13). While Arthur Lally did play for this session, many of the other members of the personnel suggest the Spike Hughes lineup of the time: Jimmy McCaffer, Lew Davis, Billy Amstell, Buddy Featherstonehaugh, Alan Ferguson, and, of course, Spike Hughes himself.

BDBR, RJJ, RL, MS-F

AMY BRUNTON (as ELSIE CARLISLE on some issues); with orchestra. Verbal interjections by unknown person (-1). London, c. November 1931.

F-1890 My man o’ war (Razaf-Williams) Film 143
F-1892 My handy man (Razaf) Film 143 (-1)

Some issues have Dominion matrix 1714 from Dominion C-307 on one side and “Hand me down my walking cane” by Karl Radlach and His Orchestra (as the HOLLYWOOD DANCE BAND) on the other. Others have the two Filmophone sides described here.

For “My handy man” the catalogue number is at least sometimes misprinted as “134” (Badrock 1998, 3).

Matrix F-1891 for “My handy man” has been reported but not confirmed (Johnson 1994, 14).

RJJ, RL, FD, JRR

SPIKE HUGHES AND HIS DANCE ORCHESTRA with vocal refrain by ELSIE CARLISLE. London, November 18, 1931.

GB-3601-1-2 Hangin’ on to that man (Myerow-Capano-Filler) Dec F-2735 (2/32), M-1023 (AU)

RJJ, RL, JRR, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, November 19, 1931.

GB-3608-1-2-3 Nobody’s sweetheart (Kahn-Erdman-Meyers-Schoebel) Dec unissued
GB-3609-1-2 (Ladies and gentlemen) That’s love! (from “George White’s Scandals of 1931”) (Brown-Henderson) Living Era AJA-5019

According to Michael Smith, these recordings would have comprised Decca F-2710 had they been issued (2009, 68 and “Decca Amendments”).

GB-3609-1 was used on Living Era AJA-5019.

Barry McCanna confirms GB-3609-2.

RJJ, RL, MS-F

With narrator HENRY OSCAR, soloists, full chorus, orchestra, and organ (Ray Noble dir.). Kingsway Hall, London, November 24, 1931.

2B-1546-1-2 The merry widow waltz (Lehár) in “Cavalcade—Descriptive Record (1st Record) (“32 Years of England”) HMV C-2330 (1/32) (12″)
2B-1547-1-2 I’ll make a man of you (Wimperis-Finck) and Twentieth century blues (Noël Coward) in “Cavalcade—Descriptive Record (2nd Record) (“32 Years of England”)” HMV C-2330 (1/32) (12″)

AS, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE (with orchestral accompaniment). Studio 3, Abbey Road, London, February 8, 1932.

0Y-2687-1-2 To be worthy of you (Davis-Coots) Zon 6069 (inc. AU) (3/32)
0Y-2688-1-2 You try somebody else (DeSylva-Brown-Henderson) Zon 6069 (inc. AU) (3/32)

RJJ, RL, FA-Zon, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with orchestral accompaniment. London, February 12, 1932.

GB-3954-1-2 I was true (Robinson-Smith) Dec F-2827 (4/32), M-1127 (AU)
GB-3955-1-2 One more kiss, then goodnight (Tobias-de Rose) Dec F-2827 (4/32), M-1127 (AU)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Vocal chorus for RAY STARITA AND HIS AMBASSADORS. Accompanied by male trio (-1). London, March 2, 1932.

S-2274-3 Leave me alone with my dreams (Gilbert) St 923
S-2277-1 An evening in Caroline (Donaldson) St 928 (-1)

BDBR, RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE and AL BOWLLY, with orchestral accomp.; announcements by JOHN WATT. Vocal duet. Chelsea Town Hall, London, March 7, 1932

GA-4069-1-2 My baby just cares for me (Kahn-Donaldson) (in John Watt’s “Songs from the Shows,” No. 1) Dec K-645 (4/32) (12″)

RJJ, RL, MS-K

With AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal duet with Sam Browne (-1). Studio 2, Abbey Road, London, March 18, 1932.

0B-3045-1-2-3 The wedding glide (Hirsch) (in “Dixieland - Medley, Part 1”) HMV B-6163 (4/32)
0B-3046-1-2 Back home in Tennessee (Donaldson) (in “Dixieland - Medley, Part 2”) HMV B-6163 (4/32)
0B-3048-1-2 Won’t you come home, Bill Bailey? (Hughie Cannon) HMV B-6162 (inc. AU) (4/32), BB B-6837 (US) (3/37) (-1)

The Kelly database shows Elsie Carlisle as singing in the intervening matrix (0B-3047: “Songs that are old live forever”; Kelly 2020), but she does not.

BDBR, RJJ, RL, BLD, AB, KOD, DAHR

ELSIE CARLISLE (some issues as AMY BRUNTON; with orchestral accompaniment). Ensemble vocal (-1). London, c. March 1932.

BT-2155 Balls, picnics and parties (Fredericks-Christie) Film 440 (-1)
BT-2156 [Alternate take of either BT-2155 or BT-2157]
BT-2157 She jumped on her pushbike and pedalled away (Wheldon) Film 440

RJJ, RL, FD

Vocal chorus for RAY STARITA AND HIS AMBASSADORS. Vocal duet with Sam Browne (-1). London, April 18, 1932.

S-2372-2 Kiss by kiss (I’m falling in love with you) (Rose-Meskill-Klages) St 952 (-1)
S-2373-2 Snuggled on your shoulder (Young-Lombardo) St 943

BDBR, RJJ, RL

Vocal chorus for RAY STARITA AND HIS AMBASSADORS. Vocal duet with Sam Browne (-1). London, June 15, 1932.

S-2477-2 You’ll find out (Gottler-Treynor) St 984 (-1)
S-2478-3 Let that be a lesson to you (Jones) St 985

BDBR, RJJ, RL

Vocal refrain for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Studio 2, Abbey Road, London, June 17, 1932.

0B-3100-1-2 ’Leven pounds of heaven (McCarthy-Malneck) HMV B-6200 (8/32)

Kelly has June 16, 1932 (Kelly 2020).

BDBR, RJJ, RL, AB, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with orchestra accompaniment. London, June 23, 1932.

GB-4589-1-2-3 ’Leven pounds of heaven (Malneck-McCarthy) Dec F-3038 (8/32)
GB-4590-1-2 Hangin’ on to that man (Myerow-Capano-Filler) Dec F-3038 (8/32)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Vocal refrain for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Studio 2, Abbey Road, London, July 13, 1932.

0B-3134-1-2 The clouds will soon roll by (Woods-Brown) HMV B-6210 (8/32)

BDBR, RJJ, RL, AB, KOD

Vocal refrain for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal duet with Sam Browne. Studio 1, Abbey Road, London, July 22, 1932.

0B-2378-1-2 A bungalow, a piccolo, and you! (Lewis-Sherman-David-Connelly) HMV B-6218 (9/32), Gramophone K-6647 (FR), Grammofono R-14810 (IT)

On July 20, 1932, Ambrose recorded a rejected take of “A bungalow, a piccolo, and you!” (0B-3148-1) with Sam Browne that may have also included Elsie.

ESW, BDBR, AB, KOD

Vocal chorus for RAY STARITA AND HIS AMBASSADORS (as THE TWELVE RHYTHM MONARCHS on Sterno). Duet with unknown vocalist (-1). Duet with a possibly different unknown vocalist (-2). London, September 1, 1932.

S-2557-2 Stop the sun, stop the moon (My man’s gone) (Cook-Robinson-Cook) St 1028
S-2558-2 I heard (Redman-Phillips) St 1023 (-1)
X-148-1 Stop the sun, stop the moon (Cook-Robinson-Cook) 4 in 1 - 6 (9/32)
X-149-2 I heard (Redman) 4 in 1 - 5 (9/32) (-2)

Elsie Carlisle does not sing in the second songs on X-148 and X-149.

In “I heard,” Rust and Forbes (1989, 1021) and Johnson (1994, 17) understand that Rudy Starita is the duettist on Sterno 1023 and leave the man on 4 in 1 - 5 unidentified. Laird identifies both duets as being with Les Allen (1996, 76).

According to Rust and Forbes (1989, 1021), Melody Maker for November 1932 reported that Ray Starita never returned from his summer vacation in America. If so, it is possible that he was absent from this session and the September 15, 1932 one.

BDBR, RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with orchestral accompaniment. Chenil Galleries, Chelsea, London, September 7, 1932.

GB-4844-1-2 The clouds will soon roll by (Woods-Brown) Dec F-3146 (10/32)
GB-4845-1-2 The night when love was born (Young-Oppenheim-Baer) Dec rejected

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Vocal chorus for RAY STARITA AND HIS AMBASSADORS (as CHICK HALL AND HIS COLLEGIANS on Redwing; as THE TWELVE RHYTHM MONARCHS on 4 in 1 - 7 from X-161). Duet with Les Allen (-1); unknown male duettist (-2). London, September 15, 1932.

S-2582-2 On a dreamy afternoon (Hargreaves-Damerell-Ewing) St 1026
S-2583-2 Gosh darn (Young-Coots) St 1042 (-1)
S-2584-2 Sweethearts forever (Friend-Caesar) St 1041, Redwing R-1003
X-160-1-2 On a dreamy afternoon (Hargreaves-Damerell-Ewing) 4 in 1 - 7 (10/32)
X-161-1 Gosh darn (Young-Coots) 4 in 1 - 7 (10/32) (-1)
X-161-2 Gosh darn (Young-Coots) 4 in 1 - 7 (10/32) (-2)

Elsie does not sing the other songs on matrices X-160 and X-161.

The “take numbers” after the matrices on British Homophone products of this time may not be take numbers at all (their purpose is still unclear), so the following observations will be in order. Take 1 of X-160 goes along at a leisurely pace, like the Sterno, and clocks in at 2:54, whereas take 2 is at a faster tempo and lasts only 2:37. The song that follows, “Song of the harp” (which Elsie does not sing), is different in the two takes as well, with an unknown male vocalist in take 1 and with Les Allen in take 2. As for X-161, in take 1 Les Allen’s first words are, “We were happy the night we met,” whereas in take 2, the unknown male singer begins with “We were happy the day we met.”

It is possible that X-161-2 was actually recorded at a “re-make session” on October 4, 1932. Some version of “On a dreamy afternoon” was recorded on that later date on S-2607-2, but it is not certain that Elsie sang it (Rust and Forbes 1989, 1021-1022).

Again, Ray Starita may not have been present at this session.

BDBR, RJJ, RL, AGK

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with orchestral accompaniment. Chelsea Town Hall, London, September 19, 1932.

GB-4844-3-4 The clouds will soon roll by (Woods-Brown) Dec F-3146 (10/32)
GB-4845-3-4 The night when love was born (Baer-Young-Oppenheim) Dec F-3146 (10/32)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with instrumental trio. September 23, 1932.

KB-134-1-2 We just couldn’t say goodbye (Woods) Dec F-3193 (11/32)
KB-135-1-2 You’re my everything (from “The Laugh Parade”) (Dixon-Young-Warren) Dec F-3193 (11/32)

The “KB” of the matrices indicates a field recording. Walker (1974) and Johnson (1994, 18) both place this session in Manchester, while Laird (1996, 76) has London. Smith (2009, 95) writes “Recorded in Small Studio - machine in mobile van.”

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Vocal refrain for the DURIUM DANCE BAND (Peter Rush dir.). London, c. October 1932.

E-1103-A-B-C Why waste your tears? (Val Holstius) Durium EN-34

Elsie does not sing the other song on this record.

BDBR, RJJ, RL

Vocal chorus for RAY STARITA AND HIS AMBASSADORS (Nat Star dir.; as RUDY STARITA AND HIS AMBASSADORS on 4 in 1). London, November 5, 1932.

S-2692-2 Mad about the boy (from “Words & Music”) (Noel Coward) St 1072
S-2693-2 Rock your cares away (Leon-Towers-Nicholls) St 1072
X-218-2 Rock your cares away (Leon-Towers-Nicholls) / Mad about the boy (Noel Coward) 4 in 1 - 17

BDBR, RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with orchestral accompaniment. London, November 9, 1932.

GB-5146-1-2 How deep is the ocean? (Berlin) Dec F-3269 (12/32)
GB-5147-1-2 Strange as it seems (Razaf-Waller) Dec F-3269 (12/32)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Vocal chorus for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Kingsway Hall, London, November 22, 1932.

0B-3494-1-2 Pu-leeze! Mr. Hemingway (Drake-Kent-Silver) RZ MR-769 (1/33), Twin FT-1503 (IN)

The HMV catalogue number B-6278 was allocated for this recording but not used (Kelly 2020).

Johnson and Laird both give December 1, 1932 as the date of this recording (1994, 19; 1996, 76), but the Kelly database and Rust/Forbes agree on November 22 (2020; 1989, 29).

BDBR, RJJ, RL, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accompaniment. London, November 28, 1932.

GB-5256-1-2 Pu-leeze! Mr. Hemingway (Drake-Kent-Silver) Dec F-3312 (12/32)
GB-5257-1-2 Please handle with care (Stride-Ballard) Dec F-3312 (12/32)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

STANLEY LUPINO AND ELSIE CARLISLE. Vocal duet with orchestral accomp. (and ensemble singing) (-1). Vocal duet with orchestral accomp. (-2). London, December 1, 1932.

GB-5274-1-2-3 I don’t want to go to bed (from “Sleepless Nights”) (Lupino-Gay) Dec F-3319 (12/32) (-1)
GB-5275-1-2-3 Just one more (from “Sleepless Nights”) (Lupino-Gay) Dec F-3319 (12/32) (-2)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Vocal chorus for RUDY STARITA AND HIS BAND (as THE BLUE RAMBLERS on Redwing). Vocal duet with Sam Browne (-1). London, December 5, 1932.

S-2767-3 Pu-leeze! Mr. Hemingway (Drake-Kent-Silver) St 1096
S-2768-1 Let’s put out the lights (Hupfeld) St 1097, Redwing R-1004 (-1)
X-255-2 Let’s put out the lights (Hupfeld) 4 in 1 - 22 (-1)
X-256-2 Pu-leeze, Mr. Hemingway (Drake-Kent-Silver) 4 in 1 - 29

BDBR, RJJ, RL

Vocal chorus for Harry Hudson’s Melody Men as ROLANDO AND HIS BLUE SALON ORCHESTRA (as the SCALA DANCE BAND on EBW 5537). Vocal duet with Sam Browne (-1). Unknown sound effects and announcer voice, with vocals by orchestra (-2). London, December 20, 1932.

14568-1 Let’s put out the lights (and go to sleep) (H. Hupfeld) EBW 5536 (1/33) (-1)
14569-2 Pu-leeze! Mr. Hemingway (Drake-Kent-Silver) EBW 5536 (1/33)
14570-1 I don’t want to go to bed (from “Sleepless Nights”) (S. Lupino-N. Gay) EBW 5537 (1/33) (-1) (-2)

Adrian and Badrock list 14568-2 as the take that was issued (1989).

BDBR, EBWR, RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accompaniment. London, January 13, 1933.

GB-5467-1-2 Fit as a fiddle (Hoffman-Goodhart-Freed) Dec F-3411 (3/33)
GB-5468-1-2 ’Twas only a summer night’s dream (Kahn) Dec F-3411 (3/33)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, comedienne, with orchestral accompaniment. London, February 14, 1933.

GB-5585-1-2 I wish I knew a bigger word than “love” (Pola-Gideon) Dec F-3435 (3/33)
GB-5586-1-2 Have you ever been lonely? (Brown-De Rose) Dec F-3435 (3/33)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accomp. (-1); ELSIE CARLISLE AND SAM BROWNE, vocal duet, with orchestral accompaniment (-2). Unknown speaker (-3). London, March 3, 1933.

GB-5629-1-2 Deep water (Schwartz-Bryan) Dec F-3507 (4/33) (-1)
GB-5630-1-2 My darling (Hoffman-Brown) Dec F-3507 (4/33) (-1)
GB-5631-1-2 Sittin’ in the dark (Adamson-Greer) Dec F-3504 (4/33) (-2) (-3)
GB-5632-1-2 What wouldja like for breakfast? (Kent-Halmy) Dec F-3510 (4/33) (-2)
GB-5633-1-2 Won’t you stay to tea? (Gordon-Revel) Dec F-3510 (4/33) (-2)
GB-5634-1-2 Hold up your hands (in the name of the law of love) (Robinson) Dec F-3504 (4/33) (-2)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal duet with Sam Browne, along with other speakers. London, March 7, 1933.

GB-5651-2 What wouldja like for breakfast? (Halmy-Kent) Br 1486 (4/33)

BDBR, RJJ, RL

With RUDY STARITA AND HIS BAND. Vocal duet with Sam Browne (-1). London, March 8, 1933.

S-2905-2 Sittin’ in the dark (Adamson-Greer) St 1154 (-1)
S-2906-1 My darling (Hoffman-Brown) St 1153
X-318-1 Sittin’ in the dark (Adamson-Greer) 4 in 1 - 37 (-1)
X-319-1 My darling (Hoffman-Brown) 4 in 1 - 39

Elsie does not sing the other songs on matrices X-318 and X-219.

BDBR, RJJ, RL

AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal refrain by Sam Browne, with Elsie Carlisle in extended speaking part. London, March 20, 1933.

GB-5690-3 Under my umbrella (O’Flynn-Meyer-Wendling) Br 1487

BDBR, RJJ, RL

With OSCAR RABIN AND HIS ROMANY BAND (Harry Davis dir.). Vocal duet with Sam Browne (-1). London, April 7, 1933.

S-2981-2 Three wishes (Furber-Posford) St 1167 (-1)
S-2982-1 Let me give my happiness to you (Furber-Posford) St 1167

BDBR, RJJ, RL

AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA; vocal refrain by Sam Browne, with Elsie Carlisle and Max Bacon in a speaking part and with ensemble singing (-1); ELSIE CARLISLE, with instr. acc. (Ambrose and His Orchestra) (-2). London, April 7, 1933.

GB-5737-1 Hyde Park Corner (Damerell-Evans-Hargreaves) Br 1495 (5/33) (-1)
GB-5739-1-2 No more love (Dubin-Warren) Dec F-3539 (5/33) (-2)
GB-5740-1-2 The porter’s love song (Razaf-Johnson) Dec F-3539 (5/33) (-2)

BDBR, RJJ, RL, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, April 11, 1933.

GB-5747-1-2 The girl next door (Everett-Connor) Dec F-3628 (9/33)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Vocal refrain for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal duet with Sam Browne (-1). London, May 5, 1933.

GB-5848-2 When my little Pomeranian met your little Pekinese (Little-Oppenheim-Schuster) Br 01510 (6/33) (-1)
GB-5852-2 You’ve got me crying again (Newman-Jones) Br 01523 (5/33)

Edward S. Walker reports GB-5852-1 as being on Grammophon 25232, but this has not been confirmed (1974; also Johnson 1994, 22).

ESW, BDBR, RJJ, RL

Vocal chorus for OSCAR RABIN AND HIS ROMANY BAND (as BROCKMAN’S BAND on Plaza and as PHIL CONRAD’S SERENADERS on Lewis). London, May 9, 1933.

S-3002-1 Deep water (Bryan-Schwartz) St 1187
X-362-2 Deep water (Bryan-Schwartz) 4 in 1 - 44
L-995-1 Deep water (Bryan-Schwartz) Plaza P-103, Lewis L-4 (8″)

S-3002 is misprinted in the shellac as S-30002 (Thomas 2020c).

Elsie does not sing in the other title of matrix X-362.

BDBR, RJJ, RL, MGT-St

MAURICE WINNICK AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal refrain by Sam Browne with speaking by Sam Browne, Elsie Carlisle, and an unknown person (-1). Vocal duet with Sam Browne with Sam Browne, Elsie Carlisle, and Max Bacon speaking (-2). Chelsea, London, May 16, 1933.

GB-5875-2 Da-dar-da-dar (Evans-Hargreaves-Damerell) Pan 25529 (-1)
GB-5876-2 Seven years with the wrong woman (Miller) Pan 25527 (-2)

BDBR, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, accompanied by trio. London, July 26, 1933.

GB-6060-1-2 I cover the waterfront (Heyman-Green) Dec rejected

Smith has the date as July 25, 1933, which may be correct, but he incorrectly lists these takes as being on Decca F-3628 (2009, 121; it was the later third take that was used).

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Elsie Carlisle and Sam Browne as BILLY CLERQ AND LALLIE LACK (as THE MASQUERADERS on Plaza). Vocal duets with orchestral accompaniment. London, June 26, 1933.

S-3095-1 Time to go (Prince-Paisely) St 1222
S-3096-1 That means falling in love (MacBoyle-David) St 1222
S-3097-1 Just give me the girl (Donaldson) St 1237
S-3098-1 If I were you (I’d fall in love with me) (Clare-Pola) St 1237
X-400-1 That means falling in love / Time to go (MacBoyle-David/Prince-Paisley) 4 in 1 - 53
L-1073-1 Time to go (Prince-Paisely) Plaza P-130 (8″)
L-1074-1 That means falling in love (MacBoyle-David) Plaza P-130 (8″)

RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, with instrumental accompaniment. London, August 2, 1933.

GB-6060-3 I cover the waterfront (Heyman-Green) Dec F-3628 (9/33)
GB-6072-1-2 Isn’t it heavenly? (Harburg-Meyer) Dec unissued

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Vocal refrain for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. London, October 5, 1933.

GB-6163-2 ’Leven pounds of heaven (McCarthy-Malneck) (in “Memories of the Mayfair, Part 2”) Br 01605 (11/33), Dec F-6239

BDBR, RJJ, RL

London, October 10, 1933.

GB-6175-1-2-3 It’s the talk of the town (Symes-Neiburg-Levinson) Br rejected

BDBR, RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, October 13, 1933, 10:30 a.m.

GB-6185-1-2 Snowball (Carmichael-Mercer) Dec F-3696 (12/33)
GB-6186-1- 2 It’s the talk of the town (Symes-Neiburg-Levinson) Dec F-3696 (12/33)

Johnson has this morning session take place in “the small studio” (presumably of the Chenil Galleries? — 1994, 23).

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Vocal refrain for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Humming and harsh whispering by orchestra. London, October 13, 1933, 12:20 p.m.

GB-6175-4 It’s the talk of the town (Symes-Neiburg-Levinson) Br 01607 (11/33)

Johnson gives “the large studio” (presumably of the Chenil Galleries?) as the location for this afternoon session (1994, 23).

BDBR, RJJ, RL

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, November 8, 1933.

GB-6297-1-2 Come up and see me sometime (Alter-Swanstrom) Dec F-3737 (1/34)
GB-6298-1-2 Making conversation (when we ought to be making love) (Carlton-Ritz) Dec F-3737 (1/34)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

Dubbing session; introduced by CHRISTOPHER STONE. London, December 1, 1933.

GA-6379-1-2-3 The Decca A.B.C. part 1 (dub of “I wish I knew a bigger word than ‘love’” from Dec F-3435) Dec K-714 (12/33) (12″)

RJJ, MS-K

ELSIE CARLISLE. Dubbing session with unknown announcer. London, December 7, 1933.

GB-6408-1-2-3 The “Daily Herald” dance medley (part 1) (dub of “Snowball” from Dec F-3696) Dec F-3790 (12/33)

RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. Unknown voice and sound effects (-1). London, December 19, 1933.

GB-6424-1-2 Did you ever see a dream walking? (from “Sitting Pretty”) (Revel-Gordon) Dec F-3812 (1/34)
GB-6425-1-2 On a steamer coming over (Goodwin-Bergman-Handman) Dec F-3812 (1/34) (-1)

RJJ, RL, MS-F

London, January 2, 1934.

GB-6450-1-2 Without that certain thing (Max and Harry Nesbitt) Dec F-3838 (2/34)
GB-6451-1-2 Who walks in when I walk out? (Goodhart-Hoffman-Freed) Dec F-3838 (2/34)

RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE. Dubbing session. London, January 5, 1934.

GA-6470-1 Elsie Carlisle successes (Intro: Have you ever been lonely?; My darling; ’Leven pounds of heaven; We just couldn’t say goodbye; Fit as a fiddle) Dec rejected (12″)

If it had been issued, this record would have been Decca K-718; the reverse side would have been “Al Bowlly successes.”

RJJ, MS-K, RP

Dubbing session. London, January 17, 1934.

GA-6470-2-3 Elsie Carlisle successes (Intro: Have you ever been lonely?; My darling; ’Leven pounds of heaven; We just couldn’t say goodbye; Fit as a fiddle) Dec unissued (12″)

See the previous dubbing session.

RJJ, MS-K, RP

Vocal refrain for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. London, February 2, 1934

GB-6525-2 This little piggie went to market (from “Eight Girls in a Boat”) (Coslow-Lewis) Br 01694 (3/34)

BDBR, RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment (?Ambrose and His Orchestra). London, February 7, 1934.

GB-6531-1-2 Gosh! I must be falling in love (Carr-Nesbitt) Dec F-3887 (3/34)
GB-6532-1-2 This little piggie went to market (from “Eight Girls in a Boat”) (Coslow-Lewis) Dec F-3887 (3/34)

Johnson notes that Ambrose’s Orchestra “made the preceding two matrices on the same day,” so it seems all the more likely that they are the uncredited orchestra (1994, 25).

RJJ, MS-F

SAM BROWNE AND GIRLFRIEND (i.e., Elsie Carlisle) with two pianos (Bobby McGhee and Eddie Carroll). Vocal duets. London, March 2, 1934.

CAR-2593-1 Gee, oh gosh! I’m grateful (Nesbitt Bros.—Carr) RZ MR-1254, G-22063 (AU)
CAR-2594-1 What’s good for the goose is good for the gander (Friend) RZ MR-1254, G-22063 (AU)

Elsie appeared on the label merely as “girlfriend” “for contractual reasons” (Johnson 1994, 25).

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, May 18, 1934.

TB-1258-1-2 Little man, you’ve had a busy day (Wayne-Sigler-Hoffman) Dec F-3990 (6/34)
TB-1259-1-2 The show is over (Dubin-Conrad-Coslow) Dec F-3990 (6/34)

RJJ, MS-F

Vocal for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. London, June 1, 1934.

TB-1294-1-2 When a woman loves a man (Mercer-Hanighen-Jenkins) Br rejected
TB-1295-1-2 Little man, you’ve had a busy day (Wayne-Sigler-Hoffman) Br rejected

The LP Decca DDV 5003/4 was at one time reported to have used take 1 or 2 of TB-1295, but in fact it uses TB-1295-3 from Brunswick 01790 (see the next entry).

RJJ

Vocal chorus for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. London, June 12, 1934.

TB-1295-3-4 Little man, you’ve had a busy day (Wayne-Sigler-Hoffman) Br 01790 (7/34), 01864

BDBR, RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, June 14, 1934.

TB-1320-1-2 A place in your heart (Coslow) Dec F-5071 (8/34)
TB-1321-1-2 When a woman loves a man (Mercer-Hanighen-Jenkins) Dec F-5071 (8/34)

RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE AND SAM BROWNE; vocal duets, with orchestral accomp. With additional speaker (-1). London, June 22, 1934.

TB-1331-1-2 Mr. Magician (won’t you bring my baby back to me) (O’Flynn-Cavanaugh-Weldon) Dec F-5079 (8/34) (-1)
TB-1332-1-2 My dog loves your dog (from “George White’s Scandals”) (Henderson-Yellen-Caesar) Dec F-5079 (8/34)

RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, July 18, 1934.

TB-1400-1-2 All I do is dream of you (Freed-Skinner-Brown) Dec F-5122 (8/34)
TB-1401-1-2 Drifting tide (Castleton-Williams) Dec F-5122 (8/34)

Johnson lists TB-1401-1 as “reported but not confirmed” (1994, 27).

RJJ, MS-F

London, August 23, 1934.

TB-1497-1-2 With my eyes wide open I’m dreaming (from “Thank Your Stars”) (Gordon-Revel) Dec F-5173 (9/34)
TB-1498-1-2 The spring don’t mean a thing (Kennedy) Dec F-5173 (9/34)

The song “The spring don’t mean a thing to me” is attributed elsewhere (including in the copyright filing) to “Lane Leighton.”

RJJ, MS-F

Vocal chorus for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. London, October 24, 1934.

TB-1672-1-2 Who made little boy blue? (Wayne-George) Dec F-5284 (11/34)

RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, October 31, 1934.

TB-1695-1-2 There’s no more you can say (Carter-Delettre) Dec F-5288 (12/34)
TB-1696-1-2 (When your heart’s on fire) Smoke gets in your eyes (Harbach-Kern) Dec F-5289 (12/34)
TB-1697-1-2 Who made little boy blue? (Wayne-George) Dec F-5288 (12/34)
TB-1698-1-2 One little kiss (Kalmar-Ruby) Dec F-5289 (12/34)

RJJ, MS-F

Vocal chorus for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Sam Browne vocal with Elsie Carlisle speaking (-1). London, November 1, 1934.

TB-1702-1 My old flame (Johnston-Coslow) Dec F-5293 (12/34)
TB-1703-1-2 (When your heart’s on fire) Smoke gets in your eyes (Harbach-Kern) Dec F-5293 (12/34), 333 (US), Br A-9676 (DE)
TB-1704-1-2 Let’s make love (Damerell-Evans) Dec F-5297 (12/34) (-1)

BDBR, RJJ, MS-F, DAHR

Vocal chorus for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal duets with Sam Browne. Singing by the orchestra (-1). London, November 20, 1934.

GB-6772-1-2 No! No! A thousand times, no! (Sherman-Lewis-Silver) Dec F-5318 (12/34), F-6926, X-1719 (AU), Br A-81929 (DE) (-1)
GB-6777-1-2 I’m gonna wash my hands of you (Pola-Vienna) Dec F-5318 (12/34)

Smith incorrectly assigns a song from this session (“The Moon Was Yellow” GB-6775 on Decca F-5317) to Elsie (Smith 2009, 163); it is Sam Browne who sings it.

BDBR, RJJ, MS-F

Vocal chorus for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Intermittent singing by orchestra. London, December 11, 1934.

GB-6806-1-2 Home, James, and don’t spare the horses (Hillebrand) Dec F-5371 (1/35), F-6926 (2/39), X-1719 (AU), 372 (US), Br A-81929 (DE)

BDBR, RJJ, MS-F, DAHR

London, January 3, 1935.

GB-6845-1-2 My kid’s a crooner (Harris-Montgomery) Dec F-5393 (2/35), 474 (US), Br A-9722 (DE)

BDBR, RJJ, MS-F, DAHR

London, January 11, 1935.

GB-6868-1-2 His majesty the baby (Wayne-Fleeson-Terker) Dec F-5379 (2/35), 474 (US)

Edward S. Walker has GB-6868-2 appearing on Brunswick A-9722 (DE), but this has not been confirmed (1974; Johnson 1994, 28).

ESW, BDBR, RJJ, MS-F, DAHR

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, January 14, 1935.

GB-6875-1-2 That’s why you need me, dear (Harris-Montgomery) Dec F-5380 (2/35)
GB-6876-1-2 His majesty the baby (Wayne-Fleeson-Terker) Dec F-5380 (2/35)

RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment (probably the Embassy Rhythm Eight). London, February 1, 1935.

GB-6925-1-2 Whisper sweet (Johnson-Trent-Nicholls) Dec F-5436 (3/35)

The two matrices preceding this one, from the same day, are by the Embassy Rhythm Eight, and they seem likely to be Elsie’s accompaniment in this matrix, though there were definitely two separate sessions (Johnson 1994, 29). Elsie was definitely accompanied by the Embassy Rhythm Eight on February 15.

RJJ, MS-F

London, February 5, 1935.

GB-6927-1-2 Dancing with my shadow (Woods) Dec F-5436 (2/35)

This matrix (like the one at the previous session) is preceded by an Embassy Rhythm Eight matrix recorded at a session on the same day, making them likely to have been Elsie’s accompaniment.

RJJ, MS-F

Vocal chorus for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal duet with Sam Browne (-1). London, February 6, 1935.

GB-6935-1-2 The whistling lover’s waltz (Damerell-Evans) Dec F-5408 (3/35) (-1)
GB-6936-1-2 Thank you so much, Missus Lowsborough-Goodby (Cole Porter) Dec F-5448 (3/35)

BDBR, RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, accompanied by THE EMBASSY [Rhythm] EIGHT. London, February 15, 1935.

GB-6978-1-2 I’ve got an invitation to a dance (Symes-Neiburg-Levinson) Dec F-5456 (3/35)
GB-6979-1-2 I’m afraid to open your letter (Sigler-Goodhart-Hoffman) Dec F-5456 (3/35)

Just as for the Feburary 2 and February 5 sessions we find one or more Embassy Rhythm Eight matrices adjacent to Elsie’s, so do we here (GB-6977; see Johnson 1994, 29); but there is little need for extra evidence of their being the accompaniment, as they are actually named on the labels.

The Embassy Rhythm Eight seems to have been sometimes referred to simply as “The Embassy Eight” (as they are on this label) in the pages of Melody Maker. In fact, the February 23, 1935 issue does so, with an accompanying photograph of them singing with Elsie (“Ambrose’s New Decca Recording Hot Band ‘The Embassy Eight,’” Melody Maker, February 23, 1935, 1, ProQuest).

RJJ, MS-F

With AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocals by Elsie Carlisle, Sam Browne, Max Bacon, and others. London, February 15, 1935.

GB-7004-1-2 A story of London life (a musical melodrama), pt. 1 (Webb-Sonin) Dec F-5478 (3/35)
GB-7005-1-2 A story of London life (a musical melodrama), pt. 2 (Webb-Sonin) Dec F-5478 (3/35)

BDBR, RJJ, RF

Vocal chorus for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocals by Elsie Carlisle, Sam Browne, and others, with Sam Browne playing the announcer. London, March 7, 1935.

GA-7010-1-2 Who’s your lady friend? (David-Lee-Fragson) in “Ambrose’s Jubilee cavalcade, Part 1” Dec K-750 (4/35), K-913 (12/40) (12″)
GA-7011-1-2-3 What’ll I do? (Irving Berlin) in “Ambrose’s Jubilee cavalcade, Part 2” Dec K-750 (4/35), K-913 (12/40) (12″)

Decca K-913’s title is simply “25 years of song and melody (parts 1 & 2).”

BDBR, RJJ, MS-K

Vocal chorus for AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocals by Sam Browne, Elsie Carlisle, and the Rhythm Sisters (Kay Munro-Smyth, Helen Raymond, and Jean Conibear). London, March 20, 1935.

GB-7014-1-2 Gertie, the girl with the gong (Sonin-Munro) Dec F-5486 (5/35)

BDBR, RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. Vocals by orchestra (-1). London, April 18, 1935.

GB-7070-1-2 A little toy piano (Billy Hill) Dec unissued
GB-7071-1-2 The house where I was born (Caesar-Carroll-de Sylva) Dec unissued
GB-7097-1-2 Algernon Whifflesnoop John (Evans-Keulman) Dec F-5524 (5/35)
GB-7098-1-2 Sweet Flossie Farmer (the lovely snake charmer) (Dixon-Wrubel) Dec F-5524 (5/35) (-1)

GB-7070 and GB-7071 would have been Decca F-5509, had they been issued; instead, that catalogue number was allocated to the Casa Loma Orchestra (Smith 2009, “Decca Amendments”; also Rust 2016, 319).

RJJ, MS-F

London, May 28, 1935.

GB-7166-1-2 Waiting for the lights to change (Cyril Ray) Dec F-5568 (6/35)
GB-7167-1-2 The gentleman obviously doesn’t believe (Carr-Pola) Dec F-5568 (6/35)

RJJ, MS-F

With AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA. London, May 30, 1935.

GB-7186-1-2 Rehearsing a lullaby (Sigler-Goodhart-Hoffman) Dec F-5572 (7/35)

BDBR, RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment (Ambrose and His Orchestra, uncredited) (-1). AMBROSE AND HIS ORCHESTRA; vocal chorus by Elsie Carlisle, Donald Stewart, and the Rhythm Brothers (Ronnie Hill, Clive Errard, and Jack Lorimer) (-2). London, June 20, 1935.

GB-7241-1-2 Mama, I long for a sweetheart (Collazo-Hill-Raven) Dec F-5586 (7/35) (-1)
GB-7242-1-2 He wooed her and wooed her and wooed her (Lupus-Harrington) Dec F-5586 (7/35) (-1)
GB-7245-1-2 Fare thee well, Annabelle (from “Sweet Music”) (Dixon-Wrubel) Dec F-5590 (7/35), Br A-9919 (DE) (-2)

According to Johnson, the first two songs were recorded in morning, while the third (which is credited on the label to Ambrose) was done in the afternoon (1994, 31).

BDBR, RJJ, MS-F

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment. London, September 7, 1935.

GB-7369-1-2 Conversation for two (Mysels-Hueston-Emmerich) Dec F-5689 (10/35)
GB-7370-1-2 Star gazing (Symes-Neiburg-Levinson) Dec F-5689 (10/35)

RJJ, MS-F

London, November 25, 1935.

TB-2010-1-2 The general’s fast asleep (Kennedy-Carr) Dec F-5761 (12/35)
TB-2011-1-2 The little things you used to do (from “Casino de Paree”) (Dubin-Warren) Dec F-5761 (12/35)
TB-2012-1-2 Poor Butterfly (Golden-Hubbel) Dec rejected
TB-2013-1-2 Solitude (De Lange-Mills-Ellington) Dec rejected

RJJ, MS-F

London, November 29, 1935.

GTB-2012-3 Poor Butterfly (Golden-Hubbel) Dec F-5764 (1/36)
GTB-2013-3 Solitude (De Lange-Mills-Ellington) Dec F-5764 (1/36)
GB-7527-1-2 Honey coloured moon (from “Music Hath Charms”) (Wayne-Carter) Dec F-5818 (1/36)
GB-7528-1-2 Public sweetheart no. 1 (from “Seeing Stars”) (Broones-John) Dec F-5818 (1/36)

RJJ, MS-F

London, January 31, 1936.

GB-7659-1-2 With all my heart (from “Her Master’s Voice”) (Kahn-McHugh) Dec F-5902 (4/36)
GB-7660-1-2 My shadow’s where my sweetheart used to be (Carr-Ilda) Dec F-5877 (3/36)
GB-7661-1-2 Up the wooden hill to Bedfordshire (Grey-Connelly) Dec F-5877 (3/36)
GB-7662-1-2 He’s an angel (Hodges) Dec F-5902 (4/36)

RJJ, MS-F

JACK HARRIS AND HIS ORCHESTRA; vocalist: ELSIE CARLISLE. Additional vocals by chorus (-1). Studio 2, Abbey Road, London, October 25, 1937.

0EA-5108-1-2 Moonlight on the waterfall (Williams-Kennedy) HMV BD-5290 (11/37), EA-2013 (AU)
0EA-5109-1-2 I’m a little prairie flower (Sarony-Holmes) HMV BD-5289 (12/37), AL-2438 (NO), EA-2014 (AU), IM-427 (IE) (-1)

BDBR, RJJ, SA, KOD

JACK HARRIS AND HIS ORCHESTRA; vocalist: ELSIE CARLISLE. Additional vocals by chorus (-1). Studio 2, Abbey Road, London, November 1, 1937.

0EA-5119-1-2 The girl in the hansom cab (Kennedy) HMV BD-5289 (12/37), AL-2438 (NO), EA-2014 (AU) (-1)
0EA-5120-1-2 The little boy that Santa Claus forgot (Connor-Leach-Kennedy) HMV BD-5290 (11/37), EA-2013 (AU), IM-427 (IE)

BDBR, RJJ, SA, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal with orch. (Ronnie Munro dir.). Vocals by orchestra (-1). Studio 1A, Abbey Road, London, November 8, 1937.

0EA-5869-1-2 Elsie Carlisle medley—part 1 (Intro.: “Gertie, the girl with the gong,” “Home, James, and don’t spare the horses,” “No, no, a thousand times no”) HMV BD-476 (12/37), EA-2058 (AU) (-1)
0EA-5870-1-2 Elsie Carlisle medley—part 2 (Intro.: “Dirty hands, dirty face,” “Little chap with big ideas,” “Little man, you’ve had a busy day”) HMV BD-476 (12/37), EA-2058 (AU)
0EA-5871-1-2 The parting of the ways (Burton-Tracey-Pope) HMV unissued
0EA-5872-1-2 The bride comes home (Seymour-Lawnhurst) HMV unissued

Johnson notes that “Con Lamprecht did the arrangements for the session...On 0EA 5870, the title ‘He’s An Angel’ was scheduled for inclusion in the medley but was not recorded” (1994, 33).

RJJ, SA, KOD

With JACK HARRIS AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal trio of Elsie Carlisle, Dinah Miller, and Pat Taylor. Studio 2, Abbey Road, London, November 29, 1937.

0EA-5142-1-2 Say “si, si” (Stillman-Luban-Lecuona) HMV BD-5305 (1/38), X-6018 (Scandinavia), El EG-6243 (DE)

ESW, BDBR, RJJ, SA, KOD

With JACK HARRIS AND HIS ORCHESTRA. Vocal duet with Sam Browne. Studio 2, Abbey Road, London, December 14, 1937.

0EA-5146-1-2 How many rhymes can you get? (Franklin-Friend) HMV BD-5305 (1/38), El EG-6243 (DE), La Voce del Padrone GW-1858 (IT)

ESW, BDBR, RJJ, SA, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orch. (George Scott-Wood dir.). Studio 1A, Abbey Road, London, December 22, 1937, 2 p.m.

0EA-5949-1-2 I still love to kiss you goodnight (from the film “Fifty Second Street”) (Bullock-Spina) HMV BD-487 (2/38)
0EA-5950-1-2 Here comes the sandman (Dubin-Warren) (Intro: Sweet and low [Joseph Barnby]) HMV BD-490 (2/38)
0EA-5951-1-2 So many memories (Woods) HMV BD-499 (3/38)
0EA-5952-1-2 Remember me (from the film “Mr. Dodds Takes the Air”) (Warren-Dubin) HMV BD-490 (2/38)

RJJ, SA, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, with Jack Harris and His Orchestra (uncredited). Additional vocals by chorus. Studio 2, Abbey Road, London, January 8, 1938.

0EA-5157-1-2 Little old lady (Adams-Carmichael) HMV BD-487 (2/38)

RJJ, SA, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orch. (Ronnie Munro dir.). Studio 1A or 2, Abbey Road, London, January 25, 1938, 10 a.m.

0EA-5995-1-2 Little drummer boy (Noel-Pelosi) HMV BD-499 (3/38)
0EA-5996-1-2 Carlisle Medley no. 2 - part 2 (“I can’t give you anything but love,” “You’re driving me crazy,” “Mean to me”) HMV BD-525 (4/38), EA-2122 (AU)
0EA-5997-1-2 Carlisle Medley no. 2 - part 1 (“What is this thing called love,” “My heart stood still,” “Just one more chance”) HMV BD-525 (4/38), EA-2122 (AU)

RJJ, SA, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orch. (George Scott-Wood dir.). Studio 2, Abbey Road, London, April 6, 1938, 3:30 p.m.

0EA-6444-1-2 Somebody’s thinking of you tonight (Schuster-Symes-Powell) HMV BD-544 (5/38)
0EA-6445-1-2 You’re an education (Dubin-Warren) HMV BD-544 (5/38)

RJJ, SA, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestra (George Scott-Wood dir.). Studios 1A and 2, Abbey Road, London, November 10, 1938, 5 p.m.-8 p.m.

0EA-7055-1-2 Proud of you (David) HMV BD-611 (1/39)
0EA-7056-1-2 Everyone must have a sweetheart (Noel-Hart-Grundland) HMV BD-611 (1/39)
0EA-7067-1-2 Joseph! Joseph! (Cahn-Chaplin) HMV BD-621 (12/38)
0EA-7068-1-2 Change partners (from the film “Carefree”) (Irving Berlin) HMV BD-621 (12/38)

Johnson notes that “[d]espite the matrix sequence, all the [sic] four titles were made at this session; the first two were made in Studio 1A and the second pair were made in Studio 2” (1994, 35).

RJJ, SA, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accompaniment (George Scott-Wood dir.). Studio 1, Abbey Road, London, February 1, 1939.

0EA-7516-1-2 Two sleepy people (from the film “Thanks for the Memory”) (Loesser-Carmichael) HMV BD-661 (3/39), IM-637 (IE)
0EA-7517-1-2 The umbrella man (from “These Foolish Things”) (Cavanaugh-Rose-Stock) HMV BD-661 (3/39), IM-637 (IE)
0EA-7518-1-2 Grandma said (Magidson-Wrubel) HMV BD-663 (3/39), Gramola AM-4951 (CZ)
0EA-7519-1-2 Deep in a dream (De Lange-Van Heusen) HMV BD-663 (3/39)

RJJ, SA, KOD

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orch. accomp. (Jay Wilbur dir.). Unknown male voice (-1). London, August 4, 1939.

R-3786-1 The moon remembered but you forgot (Gay-Eyton) Rex 9610 (9/39)
R-3787-1 Shabby old cabby (Simon-Stillman) Rex 9610 (9/39) (-1)

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, with orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, October 6, 1939.

R-3898-1 I poured my heart into a song (Berlin) Rex 9661
R-3899-1 Kiss me goodnight, sergeant-major (Noel-Pelosi) Rex 9646 (11/39)
R-3900-1 Wish me luck (as you wave me goodbye) (from “Shipyard Sally”) (Park—Parr-Davies) Rex 9646 (11/39)

RJJ

London, October 20, 1939.

R-3940-1 Sweet Fanny Adam’s daughter (Sanford) Rex 9661

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE (among various other artists). Dubbing session. London, October 25, 1939.

R-3970-1 Wish me luck (as you wave me good-bye) (Park—Parr-Davies) in “Rex marches on - part 1” (dubbed from Rex 9646) Rex 9675 (12/39)

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, November 1, 1939.

R-3983-1 My heart belongs to Daddy (Cole Porter) Rex 9674 (12/39)
R-3984-1 A mother’s prayer at twilight (Noel-Pelosi) Rex 9674 (12/39)

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). Vocals by orchestra with unknown male speaker (?Jay Wilbur) (-1). London, November 22, 1939.

R-4065-1-2 Till the lights of London shine again (Connor-Pola) Rex 9693 (12/39)
R-4066-1 Nursie, nursie (Noel-Pelosi) Rex 9693 (12/39) (-1)

RJJ, MGT-Rex

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). Unknown male speaker (?Jay Wilbur) (-1). London, December 27, 1939.

R-4142-1 Only a glass of champagne (from “Lights Up”) (Wimperis-Gay) Rex 9708 (-1)
R-4143-1 Please leave my butter alone (Mills-Nicholls) Rex 9708

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, February 12, 1940.

R-4325-1 Oh, Johnny! Oh, Johnny, oh! (Rose-Olman) Rex 9734
R-4326-1 Mr. Jones (are you coming to bed?) (Annette Mills) Rex 9734

Oriole Radio Transcription REC-18 (made at Levy’s Sound Studios in London) would appear to have Elsie singing “Oh, Johnny! Oh, Johnny, oh!” as well as “Little curly hair in a high chair” on a Carroll Levis broadcast, but I have not been able to confirm this.

RJJ

London, April 11, 1940.

R-4520-1-2 Walkin’ thru’ mockin’ bird lane (Peters-Jones) Rex 9775
R-4521-1-2 A little rain must fall (Green-Kaye-Little) Rex 9775

RJJ, MGT-Rex

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with novachord accompaniment (?Arthur Young). London, April 11, 1940.

R-4799-1 A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square (from “New Faces”) (Maschwitz-Sherwin) Rex 9816
R-4800-1 Don’t ever pass me by (Watson-Denby) Rex 9816

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with instrumental accomp. (Jay Wilbur dir.). Vocals by orchestra (-1). London, August 8, 1940.

(D)R-4936-2 Tiggerty-Boo (Hallifax) Rex 9847 (-1)
R-4937-2 Shake down the stars (De Lange-Van Heusen) Rex 9847

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with instrumental accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, October 9, 1940.

R-5043-1 I’ll never smile again until I smile at you (Ruth Lowe) Rex 9872
R-5044-1 Never took a lesson in my life (Lawrence-Poore) Rex 9872

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, accompanied by novachord (Arthur Young). London, November 1, 1940.

R-5071-1 All the things you are (Hammerstein-Kern) Rex 9882
R-5072-1 Until you fall in love (Carr-Popplewell) Rex 9882

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accompaniment (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, December 31, 1940.

R-5203-1 Oh! What a surprise for the du-ce! (He can’t put it over the Greeks) (Casiroli-Park) Rex 9904
R-5204-1 When the blackbird says ‘bye bye’ (Noel-Pelosi) Rex 9904

RJJ

London, February 10, 1941.

R-5333-1 We three (Robertson-Cogane-Mysels) Rex 9934
R-5334-1 Room five hundred and four (Maschwitz-Posford) Rex 9934

RJJ

London, April 9, 1941.

R-5566-1 When that man is dead and gone (Berlin) Rex 9960
R-5567-1 The little boy who never told a lie (Connor-Sherwin) Rex 9960

Elsie and Jay Wilbur took part in a radio documentary called “Waxworks” about the record industry and allowed some of this session (including “When that man is dead and gone”) to be broadcast (“Wax Secrets on Air,” Melody Maker, April 26, 1941, 1, ProQuest).

RJJ

London, May 22, 1941.

R-5781-2 Yes, my darling daughter (Lawrence-Sirmay) Rex 9989
R-5782-2 Let there be love (Grant-Rand) Rex 9989

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accomp. (Jay Wilbur dir.). Shout from orchestra (-1). London, June 24, 1941.

R-5917-1 Calliope Jane (from “Road Show”) (Carmichael) Rex 10008
R-5918-1 Sergeant Sally (is coming home on leave) (Kennedy-Evans) Rex 10008 (-1)

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accomp. (Jay Wilbur dir.). Vocals by orchestra (-1). London, July 4, 1941.

R-5971-2 The hut-sut song (Killion-McMichael-Owens) Rex 10021 (-1)
R-5972-1 She had those dark and dreamy eyes (Douglas-Hughes) Rex 10021

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accomp. (Jay Wilbur dir.). Vocals by orchestra (-1). London, September 30, 1941.

R-6310-1 The band played on (Palmer-Ward) Rex 10055 (-1)
R-6311-1 We both told a lie (Noel-Messini) Rex 10055

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accomp. (Jay Wilbur dir.). Vocals by orchestra (-1). London, November 14, 1941.

R-6411-1 Ma-Ma-Maria (fee-dle, ee-dle-lee, feedle, ee-dle-la) (Lewis-Stock-Rose) Rex 10067 (-1)
R-6412-1-2 You and I (Willson) Rex 10067

RJJ, MGT-Rex

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, with orchestral accomp. (Jay Wilbur dir.). London, December 19, 1941.

R-6580-2 Why don’t we do this more often? (Newman-Wrubel) Rex 10092
R-6581-2 You’re in my arms (and a million miles away) (from “Get a Load of This”) (Popplewell-Carr) Rex 10092

RJJ

ELSIE CARLISLE, vocal, accompanied by JAY WILBUR AND HIS BAND. London, January 27, 1942.

R-6600-2 Rose O’Day (the filla-ga-dusha song) (Tobias-Lewis) Rex 10106
R-6601-2 Rustic rhapsody (George-Erikson) Rex 10106

RJJ


Song Index


Appendix A: Conventions Used in This Discography

1. Session Header

Capital letters are used to identify personal names, band names, and pseudonyms used on record labels; mixed-case names do not appear on the original records. Other information from the labels (e.g., “vocal refrain,” “comedienne,” “with orchestral accompaniment”) is supplied in lowercase using original abbreviations when possible, with supplemental information not found on the label (e.g. the identity of the accompaniment or musical director) between parentheses. Any information after the first period is entirely supplemental and will not be found on the label. For reasons of economy, if all of this information is the same as it was for the previous session, it is omitted. Location (when known), date or approximate date, and time of day (when known) are listed for every session. Note that I do not attempt to identify individual band personnel; for that information, one should turn to Rust and Forbes (1989) or Johnson (1994).

2. Tables

Each row of the tables that represent the output of each session lists:

  1. Matrix and take numbers: A matrix may have a prefix (followed, in this text, by a hyphen that may not always be found on the record itself). After that follows the matrix number. After that follows another hyphen (a convention that the records themselves may not actually use) and one or more take numbers separated by hyphens. Any takes that are known to have been actually issued are underlined. All takes that are mentioned by my sources, whether issued or not, are listed explicitly in this discography. This practice results in a certain amount of unevenness between the treatment of Gramophone Company and Decca sessions, for which all takes are known from ledgers, and, say, Dominion, where we only know which issued takes survive in collections.
  2. Song name and songwriter(s): Each song’s name is listed as it appears on the record, including (using parentheses when necessary) any element of the song name that occurs in smaller type, e.g., “(When your heart’s on fire) Smoke gets in your eyes.” Then follows the name or names of any songwriters between parentheses and separated by hyphens. I keep the names just as they are on the labels and in the same order, except when there has been a mispelling (which I correct), or when a name or names have been omitted, in which case I add them at the end.
  3. Record label(s), catalogue number(s), etc.: For each known 78 rpm-era record containing a given matrix I list the label name (usually abbreviated) and the catalogue number. If the record was issued outside of Britain, the country is indicated using a two-letter abbreviation (thanks to Ross Laird [1996], it is often known when a record was issued using the same catalogue number in both Britain and Australia, in which case “(inc. AU)” is specified). If the record is anything other than ten inches in diameter, the size is listed. If the record speed is other than 78 rpm, the speed is listed (this only applies to Elsie’s 1927 Columbia sessions). I also list approximate release dates in an abbreviated month/year form (e.g., “(3/39)”). These are most frequently the dates of the first supplement that a given record appeared in and are usually taken from the relevant label discographies. When such sources are lacking, or when I have evidence that a record was being sold earlier than the label discographies suggest, I will provide dates from my own research into supplements, advertisements, and reviews (which I document in Appendix B). If a song was never issued, it is termed “rejected” if another attempt was made at recording it (even when a different vocalist was used), but it is termed “unissued” when no further effort was made at a remake (see Laird 1996, xv). Finally, if a rare unissued or rejected take appears on an LP, the LP’s label and catalogue number will be listed, but they will be underlined.

3. Session Notes

When there is information to be given or discussed that does not fit into the abbreviated format of the tables, it is listed below them in italics.

4. Source Initials

Small, boldface initials end each session entry; these represent authorities that I have found relevant for establishing the details given. Rust and Forbes’s British Dance Bands on Record (= BDBR [1989]), Richard J. Johnson (= RJJ [1994]), and Ross Laird (= RL [1996]) are cited whenever a record is mentioned in them. The various label discographies are used likewise, and the Kelly Online Database (= KOD [2020]) is present for all Gramophone Company sessions for which it has information. Other sources are cited only when they contribute to our understanding of a session in some way that I have found useful. I have implicitly relied on the evidence of my own record collection throughout, but I occasionally use my own initials (= AGK) to show that my collection has revealed something not evident from previously published discographies.


Appendix B: Original Research into Approximate Release Dates

The abbreviation BNA refers to the British Newspaper Archive.

4 in 1

  • 5: advertised as “This Week’s Titles” on September 16, 1932 (“The New Variety Record: Four-in-One,” Edinburgh Evening News, 16, BNA).
  • 6: advertised as “This Week’s Titles” on September 23, 1932 (“The New Variety Record: Four-in-One,” Edinburgh Evening News, 16, BNA).
  • 7: advertised as “This Week’s Titles” on September 30, 1932 (“The New Variety Record: Four-in-One,” Edinburgh Evening News, 16, BNA).

Bluebird

  • B-6837: released on March 3, 1937 (Bolig 2017, 202).

Brunswick

  • 1486: in the April 1933 list (John English, “Here and There: The Best Records for April,” Daily Mirror, March 31, 1933, 6, BNA).
  • 1495: in the May 1933 list (“For Your Gramophone: Jubilee Record, and Ambrose in the Latest Dance Hits,” Yarmouth Independent, May 20, 1933, 15, BNA).
  • 01510: listed in the June 1, 1933 Brunswick supplement (Pick-Up [Dan Ingman], “Commercial Records Review,” Melody Maker, June 3, 1933, 19, ProQuest).
  • 01523: in the May list (“For Your Gramophone: Jubilee Record, and Ambrose in the Latest Dance Hits,” Yarmouth Independent, May 20, 1933, 15, BNA).
  • 01605: mentioned by Fraser Wighton, “Gramophone Notes: Rhythm in Dance Music,” Leicester Evening Mail, November 10, 1933, 11, BNA.
  • 01607: described as having been released on November 1, 1933 (“The Unshakable Ambrose: Usual Brilliant Performances from Ambrose & Noble,” Melody Maker, November 11, 1933, 17, ProQuest).
  • 01694: mentioned by Richard Crooks, “The Last Elgar Record,” Daily Mirror, March 1, 1934, 24, BNA; also by Edgar Jackson, “Dance and Popular Rhythmic Records,” Gramophone, March 1934, 413, Exact Editions.
  • 01790: mentioned by R. J. Whiteley, “Some Good Dance Tunes,” Daily Mirror, July 5, 1934, 28, BNA; see also “Popular New Records: Decca and Brunswick Issues,” Montrose Review, July 27, 1934, 2, BNA.

Decca

  • F-3146: described as having appeared in the October 15, 1932 Decca supplement (Pick-Up [Dan Ingman], “Commercial Records,” Melody Maker, November 1, 1932, 935, ProQuest); Smith (2009, 93) has “11/32.”
  • F-3193: Smith (2009, 95) has “12/32,” but this record was advertised as being for sale on November 3, 1932 (A. Bramham, “Open That Gramophone: Winter Time Is Gramophone Time,” Halifax Daily Courier and Guardian, 5, BNA).
  • F-3312: Smith (2009, 103) has “1/33,” but Decca was advertising this record as for sale on December 9, 1932 (“Decca Records,” Edinburgh Evening News, 9, BNA) and as available before Christmas on December 16, 1932 (“12 Big Sellers Only on Decca,” Gloucestershire Echo, 9, BNA).
  • F-3319: same as previous.
  • F-3790: Smith (2009, 131) has “1/34,” but the Daily Herald advertised this record as early as December 14, 1933 (“Romance of a Melody in £2,500 Tunes Contest,” Daily Herald, December 14, 1933, 6, BNA).

Dominion

  • A-43: January 1929 issue (“For Gramophone Lovers: Important Re-recordings and New Issues,“ Liverpool Echo, January 11, 1929, 13, BNA).
  • A-57: February 1929 issue (“Grand Opera on the Gramophone,” Liverpool Echo, February 8, 1929, BNA).
  • A-71: March 1929 issue (“Value That Caused a Scarcity: Dominion Records,” Daily Mirror, March 4, 1929, 4, BNA); see also Christopher Stone [T. M. Peppering, pseud.] in Gramophone, March, 1929, 455, Exact Editions.
  • A-83: appeared in the April 1, 1929 Dominion supplement (Needlepoint [Edgar Jackson], “The Gramophone Review,” Melody Maker, April 1, 1929, 377, ProQuest; see also Christopher Stone [T. M. Peppering, pseud.] in Gramophone, April 1929, 502, Exact Editions).
  • A-125: June 1929 issue (“Gramophone Record’s ‘Life,’” Yorkshire Evening Post, June 7, 1929, 10, BNA).
  • A-168: almost certainly a September 1929 release. “Mean to me” was played on the air by Christopher Stone on September 13 (Christopher Stone, “A Gramophone Records Review,” Daily Mirror, September 13, 1929, 17, BNA); the record was reviewed on September 20 (H.G., “Still a Great Singer at 80,” Yorkshire Evening Post, September 20, 1929, 10, BNA).
  • A-180: mentioned in newspapers as early as October 3, 1929 (“Gramophone Notes,” Gloucestershire Echo, October 3, 1929, 1, BNA).
  • A-235: record scheduled to be broadcast on Christopher Stone’s radio show on January 24, 1930 (Christopher Stone, “A Gramophone Records Review,” Daily Mirror, January 23, 1930, 17, BNA).

Edison Bell Winner

  • 5536: reviewed on January 23, 1933 (“On the Gramophone,” Nottingham Evening Post, 6, BNA).
  • 5537: in the January 1933 list (“The Gramophone,” Coventry Herald January 27, 1933, 7, BNA).

His Master’s Voice

  • BD-621: in the December 1938 HMV list (John F. Porte, “Radio and Records,” Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald, December 10, 1938, 10, BNA).
  • BD-5290: in the January 1938 supplement (Smith and Andrews 2004, 119), but advertised as for sale on November 25, 1937 in the Nottingham Evening Post, 5.

Parlophone

  • E-6107: advertised as being in the December 1928 Parlophone Records Supplement (“Parlophone Records,” Gramophone, December 1928, Advertisements viii, Exact Editions).
  • E-6108: same as previous.

Regal Zonophone

  • MR-769: advertised December 31, 1932 (Mentiplay’s Music Stores, “We Have Your Favorite Tune!” Fife Free Press, December 31, 1932, 2, BNA).

Rex

  • 9610: Rex Records, September 1939 supplement (London: The Decca Record Co. Ltd., 1939), 1.
  • 9646: Rex Records, November 1939 supplement (London: The Decca Record Co. Ltd., 1939), 4.
  • 9674: Rex Records, December 1939 supplement (London: The Decca Record Co. Ltd., 1939), 5.
  • 9675: Rex Records, December 1939 supplement (London: The Decca Record Co. Ltd., 1939), 1.
  • 9693: Rex Records, December 1939 supplement (London: The Decca Record Co. Ltd., 1939), 5.

Appendix C: Songs Not Featuring Elsie Carlisle

A few vocals are occasionally misidentified as being by Elsie Carlisle. I think it useful to address the repeat offenders:

  • Durium Dance Band (Peter Rush dir.). “Yes, Mr. Brown” / “Leave a little for me” / “If you would learn to live” (November-December 1932). Durium F-1 mx. E-1138-B-C. The main vocals are by Sam Browne, while the female voice is that of Phyllis Robins (Rust and Forbes 1989, 193; Koert 2006, 34). The idea that it is Elsie who is speaking goes back at least as far as (and perhaps originates in) the discography of Edward S. Walker (1974).
  • Leslie Holmes. “Something came and got me in the spring” (c. June 1933). Imp 2866 mx. 6386-2. Leslie Holmes’s duettist is almost certainly Phyllis Robins.
  • Ray Noble and His Orchestra. “When you were the girl on the scooter” (November 29, 1933). HMV B-6432 mx. 0B-5801-2. The duet is by Al Bowlly and Dawn Davis. The misidentification of Al Bowlly’s duettist as Elsie was made by Rust and Debus (1973, 91).
  • Billy Cotton and His Band. “Nobody loves a fairy when she’s forty” (November 27, 1934). RZ MR-1495 mx. CAR-3063-1. The vocal is by Bertha Wilmott.

It should be noted that Walker’s (1974) attribution of the vocal in Ambrose’s 1933 “Maybe I Love You Too Much” is entirely erroneous; it is Sam Browne who sings.